Events

Search and Filter Events
JUMP TO
WITHIN
of
VIEW AS
  Month

Grant
Deadlines
Public
Scholars Project
Community
Events
NJCH
Events
Grantee
Events
View all

 
 

Public Scholars Project

March 23, 2019 at 1:00 PM | Rochelle Park, NJ | Rochelle Park Public Library

Black Comedy: No Tears, Just Politics

What pairs well with civil rights activism in the African American community? In this PSP session, it’s comedy. Drawing upon the comedic talent of Grant Cooper, who has been a stand-up comic in NYC for over twenty years, and the historical insight of African American Studies scholar Dr. Lindsey Swindall, Black Comedy brings unique insight about politics and the arts to audiences, including an examination of the historical AND contemporary significance of the intersection between civil rights activism and comedy. Participants will explore how comedy can be effective in breaking down barriers and sparking fruitful discussion.

Lindsey Swindall, Ph.D. & Grant Cooper
Educator at Stevens Institute of Technology & Comedian

Public Scholars Project

March 24, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | Toms River, NJ | Ocean County Historical Society

Theodore Roosevelt: “American in the Arena”

Bringing his vigorous persona (and his boisterous family) to the White House, “TR” helped catapult the U.S. into a new century. War hero to Nobel Peace Prize winner, naturalist to imperialist, The 26th President promoted progressive reform and stronger government control of business. Believing that the security of the American People would be achieved through leadership on the World Stage, President Roosevelt expanded U.S. influence around the globe.

Peyton Dixon
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 25, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Surf City, NJ | Ocean County Library, Long Beach Island Branch

Women, Feminism, and Islam

How often do you hear the words “Islam” and “feminism” together? Perhaps a better question is – how often should you hear those two words together? Stereotypes and perspectives about Islam sometimes include the notion of the “Poor Muslim Woman” and do not acknowledge any developments in feminism or political activism. In this session, the common notion of the oppression of Islamic women and the movement of Islamic feminism as well as a general discussion of gender and women’s rights will help participants further their understanding of Islam and feminism.

Sylvia Chan-Malik, Ph.D.
Associate Professor in the Departments of American and Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

March 25, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Oakland, NJ | Oakland Public Library

What’s the Verdict?

Each year, the Supreme Court receives 9,000-10,000 case petitions for certiorari (consideration) and less than 1% are reviewed. The cases chosen are signficiant. In this session, participants are encouraged to consider some of the pending cases before the Court. Through an examination of texts and documents participants can, with the guidance of prompting questions, consider and discuss the contemporary political and moral concerns raised by what’s on the Supreme Court docket.

Ian Drake, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Political Science and Jurisprudence at Montclair State University

Grantee Events

March 26, 2019 at 5:30 PM | Camden, NJ | Rutgers University-Camden, Writers House

Letters Home: Writing Workshop for Veterans with Warrior Writers

As part of the Letters Home project, national nonprofit Warrior Writers facilitates a series of free writing workshop for veterans in 2018-19. An experienced facilitator will guide participants through a series of generative writing prompts that engage veterans’ experiences.

All veterans are invited to sign up whether or not they are affiliated with Rutgers.

Public Scholars Project

March 26, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Manchester, NJ | Ocean County Library, Manchester Branch

Over Here, Molly Pitcher

This interpretive storytelling program relates the legend of “Molly Pitcher” (Mary Hays McCauley), the heroine of the 1778 Battle of Monmouth Courthouse – and explores the daily lives of the “women of the army” who followed their husbands to war during the American Revolution. Molly reminisces about when she accompanied her husband through summer battles and winter encampments from Valley Forge to Monmouth to Morristown. Relating her tales of firing a cannon in the heat of battle to trudging “behind the baggage,” she provides a glimpse into what it was like to be a “camp follower” in the days when American independence was a dream rather a certainty.

Stacy Roth
Historical Interpreter and Educator

Public Scholars Project

March 26, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Lawrenceville, NJ | Rider University, Bart Luedeke Center Theater

Women, Feminism, and Islam

How often do you hear the words “Islam” and “feminism” together? Perhaps a better question is – how often should you hear those two words together? Stereotypes and perspectives about Islam sometimes include the notion of the “Poor Muslim Woman” and do not acknowledge any developments in feminism or political activism. In this session, the common notion of the oppression of Islamic women and the movement of Islamic feminism as well as a general discussion of gender and women’s rights will help participants further their understanding of Islam and feminism.

Sylvia Chan-Malik, Ph.D.
Associate Professor in the Departments of American and Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

March 27, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Madison, NJ | Madison Public Library

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 28, 2019 at 1:00 PM | Sparta, NJ | Sparta Public Library

The Wit and Wisdom of Abraham Lincoln

Discover the personal side of Abraham Lincoln. The program covers the great man’s formative years, his courtship and marriage, the beginnings and development of his abolitionist view point, and his first – though not very successful – trip to Congress. Discussion points also include the causes of the Civil War, major events and turning points within the war, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address.

Bob Gleason
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 31, 2019 at 2:00 PM | North Plainfield, NJ | Vermeule Mansion

‘Ere the Shadows Fade: New Jersey’s Civil War Era Photographers

Why were photographers important during the Civil War Era? The then-new ability to capture images at that time resulted in an increase in demand – from soldiers and families – for images of loved ones. More galleries opened and photographers moved to areas in need during and post war. Several notable New Jersey photographers, including George S. Cook and Theodore Gubelman contributed to the field. In this session, the evolution of the photography industry and the significance of the images captured will guide the conversation.

Gary D. Saretzky
Archivist, educator, and photographer

Public Scholars Project

April 2, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Stanhope, NJ | Roxbury Public Library

Jerusalem: Holy – and Wholly Complex - City

Why can Jerusalem be thought of as a city of both joy and sorrow? And what does it mean to be at the intersection of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam? Jerusalem, one of the oldest cities in the world, influenced heavily by the convergence of differing religious views, is a truly unique city that allows a look at the past and the present simultaneously. In this session, participants will explore the rich and complex history and how thousands of years have shaped how we see, understand, and experience Jerusalem today.

Christopher M. Bellitto, Ph.D.
Professor of History at Kean University

Public Scholars Project

April 2, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Basking Ridge, NJ | Bernards Township Library

Clara Barton: Angel of the Battlefield

Clara Barton was born on December 25, 1821, in Massachusetts. In 1852 she founded one of the first free public schools in New Jersey. During the American Civil War, she headed for the front lines, taking supplies to wounded soldiers and earning the title “Angel of the Battlefield.” She established the first chapter of the American Red Cross. Clara’s example of indomitable strength, dogged determination and boundless good will is a model for all Americans.

Pat Jordan
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 2, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Chester, NJ | Chester Public Library

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 2, 2019 at 1:30 PM | Edison, NJ | Jewish Community Center of Middlesex County

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 3, 2019 at 6:30 PM | East Rutherford, NJ | East Rutherford Memorial Library

How We See Ourselves in What We Read

Do children, maybe your children or your students, see themselves in the books they’re reading? What do you see in those books? What they’re reading may be representative, but then again, it may not be. It’s important to identify the harmful representations overall and ensure exposure to diversity for growth and development. Reading plays such a huge role in developing critical thinking skills and empathy. In this session, a guided discussion will explore aspects of social justice and representation through a look at a variety of carefully chosen texts.

Laura Nicosia, Ph.D.
Associate Professor at Montclair State University

Public Scholars Project

April 3, 2019 at 7:30 PM | Lavallette, NJ | Ocean County Library, Upper Shores Branch

Martin Luther King Jr.: "A Man of Conscience"

Martin Luther King Jr. was one of the world’s greatest orators, as well as a pastor, activist, and humanitarian. He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 for his work combating racial inequality through the use of nonviolent civil disobedience. His most famous speech, (“I Have a Dream”) was first delivered at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963.

Keith Henley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 4, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Waldwick, NJ | Waldwick Public Library

Rosa Parks: First Lady of Civil Rights

On a December day in 1955, this tired seamstress and NAACP secretary refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery Alabama Bus. Rosa Parks' story will serve to remind all who hear it that we cannot always stand by and observe the status quo. We all bear the responsibility to bring about the changes that will help "We the People..." form that "...more Perfect Union" that is our Nation's promise.

Alex Ford
First Person Interpreter


Grant Deadlines

April 4, 2019 | Trenton, NJ | New Jersey Council for the Humanities

2019 Action Grant application deadline (required)

Final applications must be submitted through our online system by the 11:59 p.m. on April 4, 2019. Materials submitted late will not be considered.

To learn more visit: https://njhumanities.org/grants/action-grants/

Public Scholars Project

April 5, 2019 at 10:30 AM | Short Hills, NJ | Quail Brook Senior Center

The Legend of the Jersey Devil

In 1735, Mother Leeds was about to deliver her thirteenth child. Feeling tired and weary of the burden, she cursed the unborn child. According to the folklore, she gave birth to the devil’s child at their home in the Pine Barrens. Today, the tale of Jersey Devil is often discussed as just that – a tale. However, during the time of the fabled Jersey Devil’s reign of terror, South Jersey residents were truly frightened. How the accounts were reported on and the folklore that developed will be discussed during this session.

Angus Kress Gillespie, Ph.D.
Professor of American Studies and Urban Studies

Public Scholars Project

April 5, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Moorestown, NJ | First Presbyterian Church, Moorestown, NJ

The Tribal Realities of the Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape

Refusing to leave their ancestral homeland, Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape family clans remained in South Jersey when other Native American tribes were forced west. Fast forward to today, the history of the tribe continues to unfold. During the 1970s, self-governance shifted from tribal churches to a constitutional form of government. In this session, the last forty years will be considered, while paying attention to the cultural traditions that are being reclaimed in the present. Also, the tribe’s relationship with Christianity and their political status with the state and federal governments will be explored.

Jeremy Newman
Associate Professor of Communications at Stockton University

Public Scholars Project

April 5, 2019 at 8:00 PM | Highland Park, NJ | Reformed Church of Highland Park

Islam in/and America

In your eyes, what does it mean to be Muslim? How has the media and popular culture influenced how you see Muslims and Islam? In this session, participants will examine the history and presence of Islam in the United States, and the construction and evolution of U.S. Muslim identity, community, and culture from the colonial era to the present. The incredible racial and ethnic heterogeneity of American Muslim communities; the myriad of ways that Muslim practice (or do not practice) Islam; and how "Muslim" intersects with racial/ethnic categories such as "Arab," "Asian," and "Black” will all be explored through open, guided conversation.

Sylvia Chan-Malik, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor in the Departments of American and Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

April 6, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Stratford, NJ | Stratford Public Library

Walt Whitman: "The Good Grey Poet"

Whitman sought to create “a new gospel of beauty”: a uniquely American voice. He escaped the Classic Structures demanded of verse, and gave us the free form voice that has become standard today. Whitman, a volunteer in military hospitals during the civil war, mourned the assassination of President Lincoln with the well-known “Oh Captain! My Captain!” His last days were spent in Camden, NJ and in his refuge in nature at the Stafford Farm and Timber Creek.

David Scott Taylor
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 7, 2019 at 1:00 PM | Mountainside, NJ | Deacon Andrew Hetfield House

Maizie Brews a Tea Business

What if it was 1925 and you wanted to open a Tea Room? What if you were a…woman that wanted to open a business? In this dramatic presentation, Maizie Stanton will explain how her husband reacted and what she needed to do to prepare for this undertaking. During this PSP session, the challenges faced by women who were stepping out of their homes and into the business world will be explored. Participants will engage in a lively discussion about the Tea Room craze and the evolution of women as entrepreneurs.

Maureen O'Connor Leach
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 8, 2019 at 1:00 PM | East Brunswick, NJ | East Brunswick Public Library

Purity Crusades vs. Prostitution

Ending prositution at the turn of the twentieth century was a priority in many American cities. Gender, race, ethnicity, and class all played into addressing this particular vice as purity crusades grew in force. Women in the work force, cheap amusements, slumming, the emergence of the flapper, and greater openess about sex all influenced how the public viewed sex and stigmatized sexual behavior. In this session, participants will explore attemps at sex regulation in the twentieth century and draw comparisions to todays views on sex and prostitution.

Leslie Fishbein, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of American Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

April 9, 2019 at 7:30 PM | Summit, NJ | Summit Free Public Library

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 9, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Livingston, NJ | Livingston Public Library

How We See Ourselves in What We Read

Do children, maybe your children or your students, see themselves in the books they’re reading? What do you see in those books? What they’re reading may be representative, but then again, it may not be. It’s important to identify the harmful representations overall and ensure exposure to diversity for growth and development. Reading plays such a huge role in developing critical thinking skills and empathy. In this session, a guided discussion will explore aspects of social justice and representation through a look at a variety of carefully chosen texts.

Laura Nicosia, Ph.D.
Associate Professor at Montclair State University

Public Scholars Project

April 10, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Cherry Hill, NJ | Springdale Farms Conservatory

Writing About Other People's Memories

Consider how the children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren of Holocaust survivors have a living connection to the memories that were passed on to them. Survivors’ memories become their memories, and to some degree, they bind them to the past. In fact, many of us are caught between our elders’ history and the lives we are living. The legacy that binds us to the past also inspires us to pass these memories on. Building a foundation of understanding through the narratives of others, like those of descendants of survivors, this session will explore why and how we share generational stories.

Ellen G. Friedman, Ph.D.
Professor of English at The College of New Jersey

Public Scholars Project

April 10, 2019 at 6:00 PM | Elizabeth, NJ | Elizabeth Public Library

Immigrant State: Jersey’s Influential Gate

New Jersey has a big story about immigration, packed into a small state. Many may not immediately think of New Jersey, but it is a gateway state that holds an important part of America’s immigration history. Immigrant histories in Jersey have been and continue to be distinct by region and in comparison to the rest of the country. Considering and learning more about what this means can lead to more informed communities. Through the examination of film clips, texts, and media coverage, participants will have a candid discussion about issues that are being examined and debated, nationally and in local communities, by many today.

Carlos Ulises Decena, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Chair of Latino and Caribbean Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

April 11, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Hillside, NJ | Hillside Public Library

The Life and Writing of James Baldwin

The influence of writer and social critic James Baldwin reached far and wide. In this unique exploration of Baldwin’s groundbreaking literary and social justice work, actor/comic Grant Cooper and scholar Dr. Lindsey Swindall engage participants in an interactive dialogue that unravels the truths of racism in this country and examines other themes in Baldwin’s writings. Mr. Cooper’s dramatic interpretations of Baldwin’s writing are complemented by historical context from Dr. Swindall, leading to thought provoking questions that spark audience participation.

Lindsey Swindall, Ph.D. & Grant Cooper
Educator at Stevens Institute of Technology & Comedian

Grantee Events

April 13, 2019 at 3:00 PM | Princeton, NJ | McCarter Theatre Center

The Migration Plays

An afternoon of short plays that explore the nature of migration, how it is represented, and the ways it shapes the world. Celebrated playwrights Adam Gwon, Martyna Majok, Heather Raffo, Mfoniso Udofia, and Karen Zacarias worked with scholars from the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS) to bring this scholarship to life. The performance will take place in the Matthews Theatre.