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NJCH Events

August 19, 2019 at 6:00 PM | Wayne, NJ | Wayne Public Library

What is your water story?

The great state of New Jersey is shaped by water, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Raritan River, Lake Hopatcong to the Delaware Bay. Our lives, just like our geography, are shaped by water too. Recreation and travel (ever spent time at the Jersey shore?), water management and delivery infrastructure in our own communities (ever flushed a toilet?), and economic impact and transportation (ever purchased something from overseas?) – just like turning on the kitchen faucet, it’s all a part of our every day.

As part of building a statewide water story archive, NJCH is asking residents to reflect upon and share their perspectives and memories about water. We are hosting these hour-long public discussions in every county of the state (June 2019 – April 2020) to capture stories about the different ways water matters to New Jerseyans. What New Jersey water source or waterway is most meaningful to you? How do you want to preserve such resources for the future? Why? We want to know!

Each community conversation invites participants to share and/or listen and to meaningful memories and experiences of water in New Jersey. Participants will have the opportunity to contribute their water story to a statewide public archive documenting personal connections to water and waterways in New Jersey.

Why join the discussion?

- Your voice matters – contribute your water story to the archive for future generations.
- No prior preparation is needed to attend, and all are welcome to share or listen.
- Explore the connective role of water among diverse New Jersey communities.
- We rarely dedicate time and space to dive into dialogue about our most vital resource.
- Documentation of what water sources we value is critical for ensuring their protection.
- Everyone has a water story. What's yours?

What’s your water story? will be hosted in every county in the state between July 2019 and April 2020. For a complete listing of dates and locations, visit njhumanities.org.

Public Scholars Project

August 22, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Princeton, NJ | Morven Museum and Garden

The Color Line on the Baseball Diamond

Have you considered the black part of the nation’s favorite pastime? What black baseball in America meant, including pioneers like Jackie Robinson and the rich relationships in “Blackball” during America’s era of segregation, across the nation and in New Jersey is a multifaceted narrative. During this session, a robust conversation, an account by a veteran Negro Leaguer, a rendition of an "iconic" baseball poem "K.C at the Bat" by its author, Kevin Kane, and selections from the documentary “Before You Can Say Jackie Robinson” will further participants’ understanding.

Lawrence Hogan, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of History at Union County College

Public Scholars Project

August 22, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | Jersey City, NJ | Apple Tree House

Immigrant State: Jersey’s Influential Gate

New Jersey has a big story about immigration, packed into a small state. Many may not immediately think of New Jersey, but it is a gateway state that holds an important part of America’s immigration history. Immigrant histories in Jersey have been and continue to be distinct by region and in comparison to the rest of the country. Considering and learning more about what this means can lead to more informed communities. Through the examination of film clips, texts, and media coverage, participants will have a candid discussion about issues that are being examined and debated, nationally and in local communities, by many today.

Carlos Ulises Decena, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Chair of Latino and Caribbean Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

August 28, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Monroe Twp, NJ | Monroe Township Senior Center

Go, van Gogh!

At one point, Vincent van Gogh wrote to his brother that since he had no children, he viewed his paintings as his progeny. A painter and pastor, van Gogh produced more than 2,000 “brilliant children.” In this session, dozens of his works of art, with a focus on pieces at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, will be explored. An overview of his life experiences and how it influenced his art will lead to a lively discussion, which will include talking about the differences between experiencing original artwork and reproductions.

Michael Norris, Ph.D.
Art Historian

Public Scholars Project

September 7, 2019 at 1:00 PM | Phillipsburg, NJ | Warren County Library, Southwest Branch

Annie Oakley: "Aim for a High Mark"

Annie Oakley, a diminutive sharpshooter and exhibition shooter, competed in a sport and in a world dominated by men. She felt strongly that women were just as capable as men and insisted that they should strive to achieve any goal or occupation that interested them. Her motto was to “Aim for a high mark…for practice will make you perfect.” and her hope was that all women would reach the “Bulls-eye of Success.”

Kim Hanley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

September 7, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | West Caldwell, NJ | West Caldwell Public Library

George Washington Remembers New Jersey

Washington was no stranger to New Jersey. From Trenton to Princeton to Morristown to Monmouth to Middlebrook, (and more), the General spent more time here than in any other state. Join General Washington as he reminisces about his brightest and darkest moments during the battles and encampments of the “Cockpit of the Revolution.” In this session, participants will learn more about New Jersey's role in the American Revolution from the perspective of George Washington.

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

NJCH Events

September 7, 2019 at 11:00 AM | Surf City, NJ | Ocean County Library, Long Beach Island Branch

What is your water story?

The great state of New Jersey is shaped by water, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Raritan River, Lake Hopatcong to the Delaware Bay. Our lives, just like our geography, are shaped by water too. Recreation and travel (ever spent time at the Jersey shore?), water management and delivery infrastructure in our own communities (ever flushed a toilet?), and economic impact and transportation (ever purchased something from overseas?) – just like turning on the kitchen faucet, it’s all a part of our every day.

As part of building a statewide water story archive, NJCH is asking residents to reflect upon and share their perspectives and memories about water. We are hosting these hour-long public discussions in every county of the state (June 2019 – April 2020) to capture stories about the different ways water matters to New Jerseyans. What New Jersey water source or waterway is most meaningful to you? How do you want to preserve such resources for the future? Why? We want to know!

Each community conversation invites participants to share and/or listen and to meaningful memories and experiences of water in New Jersey. Participants will have the opportunity to contribute their water story to a statewide public archive documenting personal connections to water and waterways in New Jersey.

Why join the discussion?

- Your voice matters – contribute your water story to the archive for future generations.
- No prior preparation is needed to attend, and all are welcome to share or listen.
- Explore the connective role of water among diverse New Jersey communities.
- We rarely dedicate time and space to dive into dialogue about our most vital resource.
- Documentation of what water sources we value is critical for ensuring their protection.
- Everyone has a water story. What's yours?

What’s your water story? will be hosted in every county in the state between July 2019 and April 2020. For a complete listing of dates and locations, visit njhumanities.org.

Public Scholars Project

September 9, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | Haddonfield, NJ | Haddonfield Borough Hall, Auditorium

The World Changed, so Did the Music

Did Prohibition change the music of the 1920s? And did the Cold War impact the music of the 1950s? Yes, music - concert and popular - music was influenced by the technological and political changes. From the late 1800s to today, the times have shaped what and how American hear and experience opera, concert works, musicals, jazz, country and folk music, and rock and roll. In this session, participants can tune into a discussion about the sounds, aesthetics, and auras of each decade in the modern era.

Robert W. Butts, Ph.D.
Conductor & Educator

Public Scholars Project

September 9, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | Oradell, NJ | Oradell Public Library

Springsteen and his Layered Lyrics

Bruce Springsteen expects attentiveness of his listeners. How do we know this? Over the past 50 years, Springsteen has written songs and created music that have been experienced by countless fans. But many don’t know the extent to which his work has been influenced by the American folk tradition. Through experimental reinterpretation and the creation of new traditions, The Boss has worked within known folk traditions, but at the same time, created new sounds and messages. In this session, participants can learn about some of the works that have influenced one of Jersey’s most celebrated musical artists.

Prudence Jones, Ph.D.
Professor at Montclair University

Public Scholars Project

September 9, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Montville, NJ | Montville Senior House

The Wit and Wisdom of Abraham Lincoln

Discover the personal side of Abraham Lincoln. The program covers the great man’s formative years, his courtship and marriage, the beginnings and development of his abolitionist view point, and his first – though not very successful – trip to Congress. Discussion points also include the causes of the Civil War, major events and turning points within the war, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address.

Bob Gleason
First Person Interpreter

NJCH Events

September 10, 2019 at 6:00 PM | Hoboken, NJ | Hoboken Public Library

What is your water story?

The great state of New Jersey is shaped by water, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Raritan River, Lake Hopatcong to the Delaware Bay. Our lives, just like our geography, are shaped by water too. Recreation and travel (ever spent time at the Jersey shore?), water management and delivery infrastructure in our own communities (ever flushed a toilet?), and economic impact and transportation (ever purchased something from overseas?) – just like turning on the kitchen faucet, it’s all a part of our every day.

As part of building a statewide water story archive, NJCH is asking residents to reflect upon and share their perspectives and memories about water. We are hosting these hour-long public discussions in every county of the state (June 2019 – April 2020) to capture stories about the different ways water matters to New Jerseyans. What New Jersey water source or waterway is most meaningful to you? How do you want to preserve such resources for the future? Why? We want to know!

Each community conversation invites participants to share and/or listen and to meaningful memories and experiences of water in New Jersey. Participants will have the opportunity to contribute their water story to a statewide public archive documenting personal connections to water and waterways in New Jersey.

Why join the discussion?

- Your voice matters – contribute your water story to the archive for future generations.
- No prior preparation is needed to attend, and all are welcome to share or listen.
- Explore the connective role of water among diverse New Jersey communities.
- We rarely dedicate time and space to dive into dialogue about our most vital resource.
- Documentation of what water sources we value is critical for ensuring their protection.
- Everyone has a water story. What's yours?

What’s your water story? will be hosted in every county in the state between July 2019 and April 2020. For a complete listing of dates and locations, visit njhumanities.org.

Public Scholars Project

September 14, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Manville, NJ | Somerset County Library, Manville Branch

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

September 15, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Shrewsbury, NJ | Monmouth County Library, Eastern Branch

Go, van Gogh!

At one point, Vincent van Gogh wrote to his brother that since he had no children, he viewed his paintings as his progeny. A painter and pastor, van Gogh produced more than 2,000 “brilliant children.” In this session, dozens of his works of art, with a focus on pieces at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, will be explored. An overview of his life experiences and how it influenced his art will lead to a lively discussion, which will include talking about the differences between experiencing original artwork and reproductions.

Michael Norris, Ph.D.
Art Historian

Grantee Events

September 16, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | Madison, NJ | F.M. Kirby Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey

A Staged Reading of Marisol by Jose Rivera

Written by the acclaimed Puerto Rican playwright José Rivera, Marisol is the darkly imagined tale of Marisol Perez, a twenty-six-year-old Latina woman living in the Bronx. Marisol leads an unremarkable life as an editor for scientific textbooks.

Public Scholars Project

September 17, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Englewood, NJ | Englewood Public Library

The Life and Writing of James Baldwin

The influence of writer and social critic James Baldwin reached far and wide. In this unique exploration of Baldwin’s groundbreaking literary and social justice work, actor/comic Grant Cooper and scholar Dr. Lindsey Swindall engage participants in an interactive dialogue that unravels the truths of racism in this country and examines other themes in Baldwin’s writings. Mr. Cooper’s dramatic interpretations of Baldwin’s writing are complemented by historical context from Dr. Swindall, leading to thought provoking questions that spark audience participation.

Lindsey Swindall, Ph.D. & Grant Cooper
Educator at Stevens Institute of Technology & Comedian

NJCH Events

September 17, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Lavallette, NJ | Ocean County Library, Upper Shores Branch

What is your water story?

The great state of New Jersey is shaped by water, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Raritan River, Lake Hopatcong to the Delaware Bay. Our lives, just like our geography, are shaped by water too. Recreation and travel (ever spent time at the Jersey shore?), water management and delivery infrastructure in our own communities (ever flushed a toilet?), and economic impact and transportation (ever purchased something from overseas?) – just like turning on the kitchen faucet, it’s all a part of our every day.

As part of building a statewide water story archive, NJCH is asking residents to reflect upon and share their perspectives and memories about water. We are hosting these hour-long public discussions in every county of the state (June 2019 – April 2020) to capture stories about the different ways water matters to New Jerseyans. What New Jersey water source or waterway is most meaningful to you? How do you want to preserve such resources for the future? Why? We want to know!

Each community conversation invites participants to share and/or listen and to meaningful memories and experiences of water in New Jersey. Participants will have the opportunity to contribute their water story to a statewide public archive documenting personal connections to water and waterways in New Jersey.

Why join the discussion?

- Your voice matters – contribute your water story to the archive for future generations.
- No prior preparation is needed to attend, and all are welcome to share or listen.
- Explore the connective role of water among diverse New Jersey communities.
- We rarely dedicate time and space to dive into dialogue about our most vital resource.
- Documentation of what water sources we value is critical for ensuring their protection.
- Everyone has a water story. What's yours?

What’s your water story? will be hosted in every county in the state between July 2019 and April 2020. For a complete listing of dates and locations, visit njhumanities.org.

NJCH Events

September 18, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Howell, NJ | Monmouth County Library

What is your water story?

The great state of New Jersey is shaped by water, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Raritan River, Lake Hopatcong to the Delaware Bay. Our lives, just like our geography, are shaped by water too. Recreation and travel (ever spent time at the Jersey shore?), water management and delivery infrastructure in our own communities (ever flushed a toilet?), and economic impact and transportation (ever purchased something from overseas?) – just like turning on the kitchen faucet, it’s all a part of our every day.

As part of building a statewide water story archive, NJCH is asking residents to reflect upon and share their perspectives and memories about water. We are hosting these hour-long public discussions in every county of the state (June 2019 – April 2020) to capture stories about the different ways water matters to New Jerseyans. What New Jersey water source or waterway is most meaningful to you? How do you want to preserve such resources for the future? Why? We want to know!

Each community conversation invites participants to share and/or listen and to meaningful memories and experiences of water in New Jersey. Participants will have the opportunity to contribute their water story to a statewide public archive documenting personal connections to water and waterways in New Jersey.

Why join the discussion?

- Your voice matters – contribute your water story to the archive for future generations.
- No prior preparation is needed to attend, and all are welcome to share or listen.
- Explore the connective role of water among diverse New Jersey communities.
- We rarely dedicate time and space to dive into dialogue about our most vital resource.
- Documentation of what water sources we value is critical for ensuring their protection.
- Everyone has a water story. What's yours?

What’s your water story? will be hosted in every county in the state between July 2019 and April 2020. For a complete listing of dates and locations, visit njhumanities.org.

Grant Deadlines

September 19, 2019 at 10:30 AM | , NJ |

Workshop: Effective Program Evaluation

Check back for the registration link.

This workshop will be held in Central Jersey. Location TBD.

How do you know if a program is successful? This workshop will help you consider how to build evaluation into your programs, from setting the program goals and evaluation metrics to gathering data and analyzing what it means.

Public Scholars Project

September 21, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | Hillsdale, NJ | Hillsdale Free Public Library

Theodore Roosevelt: “American in the Arena”

Bringing his vigorous persona (and his boisterous family) to the White House, “TR” helped catapult the U.S. into a new century. War hero to Nobel Peace Prize winner, naturalist to imperialist, The 26th President promoted progressive reform and stronger government control of business. Believing that the security of the American People would be achieved through leadership on the World Stage, President Roosevelt expanded U.S. influence around the globe.

Peyton Dixon
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

September 23, 2019 at 7:30 PM | Fanwood, NJ | Fanwood Presbyterian Church

Clara Barton: Angel of the Battlefield

Clara Barton was born on December 25, 1821, in Massachusetts. In 1852 she founded one of the first free public schools in New Jersey. During the American Civil War, she headed for the front lines, taking supplies to wounded soldiers and earning the title “Angel of the Battlefield.” She established the first chapter of the American Red Cross. Clara’s example of indomitable strength, dogged determination and boundless good will is a model for all Americans.

Pat Jordan
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

September 23, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | Sewell, NJ | Margaret E Heggan Free Public Library

Cancer Alley or the Garden State?

It’s time to talk about the environment in New Jersey, but it’s definitely not a new discussion. Land use from 400 years ago still impacts our health and land today. Progressive thinkers in the 1970s prompted a closer look at protection, preservation, and stewardship, which resulted in protective legislative policies. Through the lens of human interest stories and environmental events, participants will discuss the environmental history of the state and how citizens can be informed and empowered to act.

Thomas Belton
Research Associate in Science Writing with the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University

Public Scholars Project

September 28, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | Plainfield, NJ | Plainfield Public Library

The Best Kept Secret in American Journalism: The Associated Negro Press

A story of persistence, creativity, and determination, the Associated Negro Press and its founder Claude Barnett delivered national and international news coverage that was remarkable for its substance and scope. Barnett, a Tuskegee Institute graduate, founded the ANP in 1919. Despite limited resources and numerous difficulties, the ANP ran for over forty years. Eventually, the black press was often referred to as “the greatest single power in the Negro race.” In this session, the story of the black press and it influence, then and now, will be discussed.

Lawrence Hogan, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of History at Union County College

Public Scholars Project

September 29, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Burlington, NJ | Burlington County Historical Society

Over Here, Molly Pitcher

This interpretive storytelling program relates the legend of “Molly Pitcher” (Mary Hays McCauley), the heroine of the 1778 Battle of Monmouth Courthouse – and explores the daily lives of the “women of the army” who followed their husbands to war during the American Revolution. Molly reminisces about when she accompanied her husband through summer battles and winter encampments from Valley Forge to Monmouth to Morristown. Relating her tales of firing a cannon in the heat of battle to trudging “behind the baggage,” she provides a glimpse into what it was like to be a “camp follower” in the days when American independence was a dream rather a certainty.

Stacy Roth
Historical Interpreter and Educator

Public Scholars Project

October 4, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | Monroe Twp, NJ | Monroe Township Senior Center

You’ve Got a Friend

When you think of the word friendship, what comes to mind? Happiness? Laughter? Birthdays? Hugs? What about the word oddity? Friendship is downright odd. Unlike other significant relationships, friendships are relationships born of choice and friends exists for the purpose of being just that: friends. We all have these relationships, but do we ever spend time considering our expectations, limits, and how they evolve? This lively interactive session won’t guarantee new friends, but will result in a better understanding of what friendship means in our own lives.

Troy Robert Mack, Ph.D.
Special Projects Manager, Jersey City Police Department

Public Scholars Project

October 5, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Hillsborough, NJ | Somerset County Library, Hillsborough Branch

Ichabod Crane, Washington Irving, and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

The presenter brings an all new adaptation of this horror story written by Washington Irving. The interactive one-man interpretation of the story of the headless horseman draws the audience into the schoolmaster’s world in sleepy Tarry Town. The program, followed by discussion about this 19th century author who also wrote Rip Van Winkle, ends with a dramatic reading of the story’s postscript.

Neill Hartley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

October 5, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | Jackson, NJ | Forest Resource Education Center

Theodore Roosevelt: “American in the Arena”

Bringing his vigorous persona (and his boisterous family) to the White House, “TR” helped catapult the U.S. into a new century. War hero to Nobel Peace Prize winner, naturalist to imperialist, The 26th President promoted progressive reform and stronger government control of business. Believing that the security of the American People would be achieved through leadership on the World Stage, President Roosevelt expanded U.S. influence around the globe.

Peyton Dixon
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

October 6, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Ridgefield, NJ | Ridgefield Public Library

Living and Laughing by the Chopsticks-Fork Principle

From a place of delight and good humor, the Chopsticks-Fork Principle encourages people to realize and understand (and laugh about) how we are all at least bi-cultural in a way that shatters stereotypes yet explains the generalizations. The talk is an invitation to first wonder “Can the Tooth Fairy survive the Melting Pot?” “Can you fail or succeed simultaneously in two cultures?” and “What happens when you have a sub-conscious but your (grand)mother doesn’t?” and then to explore how the discussion help listeners re-think their own cultural heritages.

Cathy Bao Bean
Chair, Society for Values in Higher Education

Public Scholars Project

October 6, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | New Providence, NJ | New Providence Memorial Library

George Washington Remembers New Jersey

Washington was no stranger to New Jersey. From Trenton to Princeton to Morristown to Monmouth to Middlebrook, (and more), the General spent more time here than in any other state. Join General Washington as he reminisces about his brightest and darkest moments during the battles and encampments of the “Cockpit of the Revolution.” In this session, participants will learn more about New Jersey's role in the American Revolution from the perspective of George Washington.

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

October 7, 2019 at 7:30 PM | Southampton, NJ | Southampton Old Towne Hall

Theodore Roosevelt: “American in the Arena”

Bringing his vigorous persona (and his boisterous family) to the White House, “TR” helped catapult the U.S. into a new century. War hero to Nobel Peace Prize winner, naturalist to imperialist, The 26th President promoted progressive reform and stronger government control of business. Believing that the security of the American People would be achieved through leadership on the World Stage, President Roosevelt expanded U.S. influence around the globe.

Peyton Dixon
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

October 9, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Mays Landing, NJ | Atlantic County Library, Mays Landing Branch

Ichabod Crane, Washington Irving, and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

The presenter brings an all new adaptation of this horror story written by Washington Irving. The interactive one-man interpretation of the story of the headless horseman draws the audience into the schoolmaster’s world in sleepy Tarry Town. The program, followed by discussion about this 19th century author who also wrote Rip Van Winkle, ends with a dramatic reading of the story’s postscript.

Neill Hartley
First Person Interpreter