Events for March 2020

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Public Scholars Project

March 1, 2020 at 2:00 PM | Fanwood, NJ | Fanwood Memorial Library

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, an American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 1, 2020 at 2:00 PM | Bridgewater, NJ | Heritage Trail Association (Van Horne House)

Reclaiming Our Voice: New Jersey’s Central Role in the Fight for Women's Suffrage

Lillian Feickert, president of the NJ Woman Suffrage Association from 1912-1920, was committed to the fight for women’s suffrage. Many do not realize the role that New Jersey played in the suffrage movement. During this PSP session, Feickert explores more about why some NJ women once had the vote and then lost it for over a century. Also, she shares stories about how nationally-known suffrage advocates Lucy Stone and Elizabeth Cady Stanton staged tax and voting protests in the state. Feickert describes how Alice Paul became the dynamo who re-energized the push for a federal amendment and how Dr. Florence Spearing Randolph brought black women into the movement. Participants will learn that women were not “given” the vote, but fought for it for generations.

Carol Simon Levin
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

March 2, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Long Valley, NJ | Washington Township Free Public Library

Harriet Beecher Stowe: Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Dominion of Conscience

In 1852 Harriet Beecher Stowe published “Uncle Tom’s Cabin, or Life Among the Lowly” which helped move the conscience of the country to imperative cause of Abolitionism. Her story energized anti-slavery forces in the North, while provoking widespread anger in the pro-slavery South. Allegedly, when she met Abraham Lincoln, he said, “So you are the little woman that wrote the book that started this great war?”

Kim Hanley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 2, 2020 at 6:30 PM | Union, NJ | Union Free Public Library

Reclaiming Our Voice: New Jersey’s Central Role in the Fight for Women's Suffrage

Lillian Feickert, president of the NJ Woman Suffrage Association from 1912-1920, was committed to the fight for women’s suffrage. Many do not realize the role that New Jersey played in the suffrage movement. During this PSP session, Feickert explores more about why some NJ women once had the vote and then lost it for over a century. Also, she shares stories about how nationally-known suffrage advocates Lucy Stone and Elizabeth Cady Stanton staged tax and voting protests in the state. Feickert describes how Alice Paul became the dynamo who re-energized the push for a federal amendment and how Dr. Florence Spearing Randolph brought black women into the movement. Participants will learn that women were not “given” the vote, but fought for it for generations.

Carol Simon Levin
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

March 2, 2020 at 10:30 AM | Somerset, NJ | Quail Brook Senior Center

The Best Kept Secret in American Journalism: The Associated Negro Press

A story of persistence, creativity, and determination, the Associated Negro Press and its founder Claude Barnett delivered national and international news coverage that was remarkable for its substance and scope. Barnett, a Tuskegee Institute graduate, founded the ANP in 1919. Despite limited resources and numerous difficulties, the ANP ran for over forty years. Eventually, the black press was often referred to as “the greatest single power in the Negro race.” In this session, the story of the black press and it influence, then and now, will be discussed.

Lawrence Hogan, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of History at Union County College

NJCH Events

March 2, 2020 - April 10, 2020 | West Deptford, NJ | West Deptford Free Public Library

Water/Ways @ West Deptford Free Public Library

The Smithsonian Institution's "Water/Ways" exhibition dives into water - an essential component of life on our planet, environmentally, culturally, and historically.

Traveling to six New Jersey communities, all shaped by water in different ways, "Water/Ways" will encourage individuals to consider the different ways water impacts every day life.

Public Scholars Project

March 3, 2020 at 5:00 PM | Atlantic City, NJ | Atlantic City Free Public Library

Reclaiming Our Voice: New Jersey’s Central Role in the Fight for Women's Suffrage

Lillian Feickert, president of the NJ Woman Suffrage Association from 1912-1920, was committed to the fight for women’s suffrage. Many do not realize the role that New Jersey played in the suffrage movement. During this PSP session, Feickert explores more about why some NJ women once had the vote and then lost it for over a century. Also, she shares stories about how nationally-known suffrage advocates Lucy Stone and Elizabeth Cady Stanton staged tax and voting protests in the state. Feickert describes how Alice Paul became the dynamo who re-energized the push for a federal amendment and how Dr. Florence Spearing Randolph brought black women into the movement. Participants will learn that women were not “given” the vote, but fought for it for generations.

Carol Simon Levin
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

March 3, 2020 at 1:30 PM | Edison, NJ | Jewish Community Center of Middlesex County

The Fiddle in America: A History and Demonstration

How often do you get to hear music and then have a high-energy conversation about its role in historical traditions, its cultural influence, and its style and technique? Until the early twentieth century, the fiddle was the centerpiece of American folk music and folk culture. In this interactive session, Backes explores the origins and history of American fiddle music—covering a range of styles and modes of expression—and raises along the way big questions about musical tradition and music making.

Matthew Backes, Ph.D.
American Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

March 3, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Fort Lee, NJ | Fort Lee Public Library

“The Movement is a Sort of Mosaic”: A History of the Women’s Suffrage Movement

Reflecting on the women’s suffrage movement, Alice Paul remarked: “the movement is a sort of mosaic. Each of us puts in one little stone, and then you get a great mosaic at the end." This PSP program examines the long history of women’s activism over the course of the 19th century, to highlight the multi-faceted mosaic of the women’s suffrage movement. Traditional accounts of the women’s suffrage movement tend to focus on key events, such as the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848 or the 1913 Women’s Suffrage Parade held in Washington, D.C. Yet such famous moments were part of a much larger movement that created ripples across American society and politics. Throughout the 19th century, many women became involved in a number of reform movements, including educational access, abolitionism, charitable societies, married women’s property rights, temperance, dress reform, and of course, the suffrage movement. Participants will explore the diverse paths that led women to engage in civic and public life to make a difference in their own communities.

Lucia McMahon, Ph.D.
Professor of History and Department Chair, William Paterson University

Public Scholars Project

March 3, 2020 at 2:00 PM | Beachwood, NJ | Ocean County Library, Beachwood Branch

Reclaiming Our Voice: New Jersey’s Central Role in the Fight for Women's Suffrage

Lillian Feickert, president of the NJ Woman Suffrage Association from 1912-1920, was committed to the fight for women’s suffrage. Many do not realize the role that New Jersey played in the suffrage movement. During this PSP session, Feickert explores more about why some NJ women once had the vote and then lost it for over a century. Also, she shares stories about how nationally-known suffrage advocates Lucy Stone and Elizabeth Cady Stanton staged tax and voting protests in the state. Feickert describes how Alice Paul became the dynamo who re-energized the push for a federal amendment and how Dr. Florence Spearing Randolph brought black women into the movement. Participants will learn that women were not “given” the vote, but fought for it for generations.

Carol Simon Levin
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

March 4, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Cranbury, NJ | First Presbyterian Church of Cranbury

The Shannachie of Glendunbun Ballybeg: Traditional Celtic Tales

The wit and wisdom, humor and horror, and hubris and humanity of a people are found in their traditional stories. Compelling storyteller David Emerson retells (and embroiders) the colorful and ancient tales of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and Cornwall in a presentation that will “warm, tickle, or chill the heart.”

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

March 5, 2020 at 6:30 PM | Cranbury, NJ | Cranbury Public Library

“The Movement is a Sort of Mosaic”: A History of the Women’s Suffrage Movement

Reflecting on the women’s suffrage movement, Alice Paul remarked: “the movement is a sort of mosaic. Each of us puts in one little stone, and then you get a great mosaic at the end." This PSP program examines the long history of women’s activism over the course of the 19th century, to highlight the multi-faceted mosaic of the women’s suffrage movement. Traditional accounts of the women’s suffrage movement tend to focus on key events, such as the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848 or the 1913 Women’s Suffrage Parade held in Washington, D.C. Yet such famous moments were part of a much larger movement that created ripples across American society and politics. Throughout the 19th century, many women became involved in a number of reform movements, including educational access, abolitionism, charitable societies, married women’s property rights, temperance, dress reform, and of course, the suffrage movement. Participants will explore the diverse paths that led women to engage in civic and public life to make a difference in their own communities.

Lucia McMahon, Ph.D.
Professor of History and Department Chair, William Paterson University

Public Scholars Project

March 5, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Bridgewater, NJ | Somerset County Library, Bridgewater Branch

Votes for Women: Celebrating 100 Years of Women's Suffrage

Have you ever considered the strategies and strategists that propelled the Suffrage Movement in our nation? Many don’t know it, but New Jersey played a pivotal role in the movement that changed our nation’s history. For example, New Jersey’s Woodrow Wilson was an initial opponent and then an eventual a supporter of suffrage. Also, the Garden State served as an incubator for leaders and suffragists, including Alice Paul. And, of course, our state was a ratifier of the 19th Amendment. How did the long-lasting effects of those strategies influence the past 100 years of women’s participation in political life? In this PSP program, participants will examine the last century through the lens of historical documents and explore perceptions, both familiar and unfamiliar, of women in the public sphere.

Brigid Callahan Harrison
Professor of Political Science and Law, Montclair State University

Public Scholars Project

March 6, 2020 at 11:30 AM | New Egypt, NJ | Ocean County Library, Plumsted Branch

Votes for Women: Celebrating 100 Years of Women's Suffrage

Have you ever considered the strategies and strategists that propelled the Suffrage Movement in our nation? Many don’t know it, but New Jersey played a pivotal role in the movement that changed our nation’s history. For example, New Jersey’s Woodrow Wilson was an initial opponent and then an eventual a supporter of suffrage. Also, the Garden State served as an incubator for leaders and suffragists, including Alice Paul. And, of course, our state was a ratifier of the 19th Amendment. How did the long-lasting effects of those strategies influence the past 100 years of women’s participation in political life? In this PSP program, participants will examine the last century through the lens of historical documents and explore perceptions, both familiar and unfamiliar, of women in the public sphere.

Brigid Callahan Harrison
Professor of Political Science and Law, Montclair State University

Public Scholars Project

March 7, 2020 at 2:00 PM | Lakewood, NJ | Ocean County Library, Lakewood Branch

Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Satire

For decades, countless American women fought for the right to vote. But many others—like the costumed fictional Anti-Suffragist portrayed in this program—fought against it. Written by pro-Suffragist Marie Jenney Howe in 1912, this witty, insightful satire sheds light on some of the apparently absurd arguments offered by those opposed to the Suffragist movement. Anti arguments like “If given the ballot, would she destroy civilization by voting with—or by voting against !—her own husband ?” will be explored, while insight about the sociological, historical, and political context informs the arguments against Suffrage.

Michèle LaRue
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 7, 2020 at 12:00 PM | Manville, NJ | Somerset County Library, Manville Branch

Lucretia Coffin Mott: Quaker Minister, Abolitionist, and Suffragist

In an age when most women were not expected to think about issues of the day, Lucretia Mott not only contemplated them, but also spoke out on them. Mott supported the Anti-Slavery movement and advocated the use of Free Produce. She was elected as an American Representative to the 1840 General (or World’s) Anti-Slavery Convention. When women were excluded from participating, were required to sit in a segregated area, Mott began to realize that she must also muster her efforts towards women’s equality. Mott joined Elizabeth Cady Stanton calling together the first women’s rights convention in Seneca Falls, NY. In this program Mrs. Mott will examine the list of grievances in the Declaration of Sentiments; a list which clearly detailed the lack of rights "enjoyed" by women in the United States, and how much they would have to overcome before ever attaining the Elective Franchise - The Vote.

Kim Hanley
First Person Interpreter

NJCH Events

March 7, 2020 at 1:00 PM | West Deptford, NJ | West Deptford Free Public Library

What is your water story?

The great state of New Jersey is shaped by water, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Raritan River, Lake Hopatcong to the Delaware Bay. Our lives, just like our geography, are shaped by water too. Recreation and travel (ever spent time at the Jersey shore?), water management and delivery infrastructure in our own communities (ever flushed a toilet?), and economic impact and transportation (ever purchased something from overseas?) – just like turning on the kitchen faucet, it’s all a part of our every day.

As part of building a statewide water story archive, this program invites participants to share and/or listen and to meaningful memories and experiences of water in New Jersey.

Jennifer Kitson, Ph.D. & Megan Bucknum
Professors, Rowan University

Public Scholars Project

March 9, 2020 at 6:30 PM | Tuckerton, NJ | Ocean County Library, Tuckerton Branch

Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Satire

For decades, countless American women fought for the right to vote. But many others—like the costumed fictional Anti-Suffragist portrayed in this program—fought against it. Written by pro-Suffragist Marie Jenney Howe in 1912, this witty, insightful satire sheds light on some of the apparently absurd arguments offered by those opposed to the Suffragist movement. Anti arguments like “If given the ballot, would she destroy civilization by voting with—or by voting against !—her own husband ?” will be explored, while insight about the sociological, historical, and political context informs the arguments against Suffrage.

Michèle LaRue
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 9, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Ewing, NJ | Mercer County Library, Ewing Branch

Reclaiming Our Voice: New Jersey’s Central Role in the Fight for Women's Suffrage

Lillian Feickert, president of the NJ Woman Suffrage Association from 1912-1920, was committed to the fight for women’s suffrage. Many do not realize the role that New Jersey played in the suffrage movement. During this PSP session, Feickert explores more about why some NJ women once had the vote and then lost it for over a century. Also, she shares stories about how nationally-known suffrage advocates Lucy Stone and Elizabeth Cady Stanton staged tax and voting protests in the state. Feickert describes how Alice Paul became the dynamo who re-energized the push for a federal amendment and how Dr. Florence Spearing Randolph brought black women into the movement. Participants will learn that women were not “given” the vote, but fought for it for generations.

Carol Simon Levin
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

March 10, 2020 at 2:00 PM | Waretown, NJ | Ocean County Library, Waretown Branch

Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Satire

For decades, countless American women fought for the right to vote. But many others—like the costumed fictional Anti-Suffragist portrayed in this program—fought against it. Written by pro-Suffragist Marie Jenney Howe in 1912, this witty, insightful satire sheds light on some of the apparently absurd arguments offered by those opposed to the Suffragist movement. Anti arguments like “If given the ballot, would she destroy civilization by voting with—or by voting against !—her own husband ?” will be explored, while insight about the sociological, historical, and political context informs the arguments against Suffrage.

Michèle LaRue
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 11, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Somerville, NJ | Somerset County Library, Somerville Branch

Harriet Beecher Stowe: Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Dominion of Conscience

In 1852 Harriet Beecher Stowe published “Uncle Tom’s Cabin, or Life Among the Lowly” which helped move the conscience of the country to imperative cause of Abolitionism. Her story energized anti-slavery forces in the North, while provoking widespread anger in the pro-slavery South. Allegedly, when she met Abraham Lincoln, he said, “So you are the little woman that wrote the book that started this great war?”

Kim Hanley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 11, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Westfield, NJ | Westfield Memorial Library

Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Satire

For decades, countless American women fought for the right to vote. But many others—like the costumed fictional Anti-Suffragist portrayed in this program—fought against it. Written by pro-Suffragist Marie Jenney Howe in 1912, this witty, insightful satire sheds light on some of the apparently absurd arguments offered by those opposed to the Suffragist movement. Anti arguments like “If given the ballot, would she destroy civilization by voting with—or by voting against !—her own husband ?” will be explored, while insight about the sociological, historical, and political context informs the arguments against Suffrage.

Michèle LaRue
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 16, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Old Tappan, NJ | Old Tappan Public Library

The Shannachie of Glendunbun Ballybeg: Traditional Celtic Tales

The wit and wisdom, humor and horror, and hubris and humanity of a people are found in their traditional stories. Compelling storyteller David Emerson retells (and embroiders) the colorful and ancient tales of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and Cornwall in a presentation that will “warm, tickle, or chill the heart.”

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Grant Deadlines

March 31, 2020 | Trenton, NJ | New Jersey Council for the Humanities

2020 UPDATED Grant Application Deadline (required)

Final applications must be submitted through our online system by the 11:59 p.m. on March 31, 2020. Materials submitted late will not be considered.

To learn more visit: https://njhumanities.org/grants/grants-overview/