Events for February 2020

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NJCH Events

January 13, 2020 - February 22, 2020 | Clinton, NJ | Red Mill Museum Village

Water/Ways @ Red Mill Village

The Smithsonian Institution's "Water/Ways" exhibition dives into water - an essential component of life on our planet, environmentally, culturally, and historically.

Traveling to six New Jersey communities, all shaped by water in different ways, "Water/Ways" will encourage individuals to consider the different ways water impacts every day life.

Public Scholars Project

February 3, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Somerset, NJ | Franklin Township Public Library

The Color Line on the Baseball Diamond

Have you considered the black part of the nation’s favorite pastime? What black baseball in America meant, including pioneers like Jackie Robinson and the rich relationships in “Blackball” during America’s era of segregation, across the nation and in New Jersey is a multifaceted narrative. During this session, a robust conversation, an account by a veteran Negro Leaguer, a rendition of an "iconic" baseball poem "K.C at the Bat" by its author, Kevin Kane, and selections from the documentary “Before You Can Say Jackie Robinson” will further participants’ understanding.

Lawrence Hogan, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of History at Union County College

Public Scholars Project

February 3, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Long Valley, NJ | Washington Township Free Public Library

Langston Hughes: I Too…Have a Song to Sing

Jazz poet and social activist Langston Hughes utilized the American language, music, slang, and religious views to educate the world about African American lifestyles during the Harlem Renaissance. His jazz poetry depicted the "low-life," or the real life experiences of blacks, in the lower social-economic strata. His criticisms focused on the divisions, and prejudices, based on skin color within the black community. In this program, participants will explore one it means to be oneself and how Hughes used his poetry to share messages of experiences.

Keith Henley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 4, 2020 at 4:00 PM | Middletown, NJ | Middletown Township Public Library

Paul Robeson, A Chautauqua

Mr. Jefferson brings the life of Paul Robeson alive through first-person historical characterization. Robeson, one of the most well known African-Americans of the 20th century, was a renaissance man, a social activist, scholar, intellectual, lawyer, All-American athlete, singer, linguist, humanist, and advocate for international peace.

Marvin Jefferson
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 5, 2020 at 1:00 PM | Haddonfield, NJ | Tavistock Country Club

Reclaiming Our Voice: New Jersey’s Central Role in the Fight for Women's Suffrage

Lillian Feickert, president of the NJ Woman Suffrage Association from 1912-1920, was committed to the fight for women’s suffrage. Many do not realize the role that New Jersey played in the suffrage movement. During this PSP session, Feickert explores more about why some NJ women once had the vote and then lost it for over a century. Also, she shares stories about how nationally-known suffrage advocates Lucy Stone and Elizabeth Cady Stanton staged tax and voting protests in the state. Feickert describes how Alice Paul became the dynamo who re-energized the push for a federal amendment and how Dr. Florence Spearing Randolph brought black women into the movement. Participants will learn that women were not “given” the vote, but fought for it for generations.

Public Scholars Project

February 6, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Swedesboro, NJ | Gloucester County Library, Swedesboro Branch

Langston Hughes: I Too…Have a Song to Sing

Jazz poet and social activist Langston Hughes utilized the American language, music, slang, and religious views to educate the world about African American lifestyles during the Harlem Renaissance. His jazz poetry depicted the "low-life," or the real life experiences of blacks, in the lower social-economic strata. His criticisms focused on the divisions, and prejudices, based on skin color within the black community. In this program, participants will explore one it means to be oneself and how Hughes used his poetry to share messages of experiences.

Keith Henley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 6, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Summit, NJ | Summit Free Public Library

From Revolution to Solutions: Informed Cinema & Conversation about Newark

Newark, the largest city in New Jersey, has a complex and rich history. Clips from three acclaimed, award-winning documentaries by filmmakers Marylou & Jerome Bongiorno – Revolution ’67 (explores the 1967 Newark Riots/Rebellion), The Rule (examines urban school reform using the model of St. Benedict’s Prep), and Rust (investigates solutions to intergenerational poverty including prisoner reentry) – will allow a look at the past, present, and future of Newark. Participants will be able to learn about and discuss the opportunities and challenges of urban environments by examining Newark as a microcosm.

Marylou & Jerome Bongiorno
Filmmakers

Public Scholars Project

February 6, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Freehold, NJ | West Freehold Elementary School

Reclaiming Our Voice: New Jersey’s Central Role in the Fight for Women's Suffrage

Lillian Feickert, president of the NJ Woman Suffrage Association from 1912-1920, was committed to the fight for women’s suffrage. Many do not realize the role that New Jersey played in the suffrage movement. During this PSP session, Feickert explores more about why some NJ women once had the vote and then lost it for over a century. Also, she shares stories about how nationally-known suffrage advocates Lucy Stone and Elizabeth Cady Stanton staged tax and voting protests in the state. Feickert describes how Alice Paul became the dynamo who re-energized the push for a federal amendment and how Dr. Florence Spearing Randolph brought black women into the movement. Participants will learn that women were not “given” the vote, but fought for it for generations.

Carol Simon Levin
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

February 6, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Madison, NJ | Museum of Early Trades and Crafts

#lookfortheriver: How “finding” lost waterways can help us adapt

As we travel through our communities, few of us think about the hidden world of streams and rivers that once flowed across the landscape. In the face of climate change and increased precipitation, real life has shown us that stormwater runoff and flooding have intensified. Centuries of piping, culverting and development have hidden the vast majority of waterways in urban areas. The impact of these factors can be devastating: communities are alienated from their streams and historic ecologies, habitats are degraded, and water quality is compromised. In this PSP session, participants will examine the changes made to our urban streams and hydrology over time. How to read a topographic map, identify watersheds, and #lookfortheriver – to empower community members to explore their own local landscapes – will be included in this program too.

Heather Fenyk, Ph.D.
Founder & President, Lower Raritan Watershed Partnership

Public Scholars Project

February 7, 2020 at 2:00 PM | Westfield, NJ | Second Westfield Senior Citizen Housing

Franklin Delano Roosevelt: "An Arsenal for Democracy"

The date is December 29, 1940. Franklin Delano Roosevelt has just been re-elected to an unprecedented third term in office. But the world is in a crisis. Nazi Germany has blazed the path of destruction across Europe, and America may soon be drawn into war. Meet with the President just prior to his delivery of the famous “Arsenal for Democracy” speech.

Neill Hartley
First Person Interpreter

NJCH Events

February 8, 2020 at 1:30 PM | South River, NJ | South River Public Library

What is your water story?

The great state of New Jersey is shaped by water, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Raritan River, Lake Hopatcong to the Delaware Bay. Our lives, just like our geography, are shaped by water too. Recreation and travel (ever spent time at the Jersey shore?), water management and delivery infrastructure in our own communities (ever flushed a toilet?), and economic impact and transportation (ever purchased something from overseas?) – just like turning on the kitchen faucet, it’s all a part of our every day.

As part of building a statewide water story archive, NJCH is asking residents to reflect upon and share their perspectives and memories about water. We are hosting these hour-long public discussions in every county of the state (June 2019 – April 2020) to capture stories about the different ways water matters to New Jerseyans. What New Jersey water source or waterway is most meaningful to you? How do you want to preserve such resources for the future? Why? We want to know!

Each community conversation invites participants to share and/or listen and to meaningful memories and experiences of water in New Jersey. Participants will have the opportunity to contribute their water story to a statewide public archive documenting personal connections to water and waterways in New Jersey.

Why join the discussion?

- Your voice matters – contribute your water story to the archive for future generations.
- No prior preparation is needed to attend, and all are welcome to share or listen.
- Explore the connective role of water among diverse New Jersey communities.
- We rarely dedicate time and space to dive into dialogue about our most vital resource.
- Documentation of what water sources we value is critical for ensuring their protection.
- Everyone has a water story. What's yours?

What’s your water story? will be hosted in every county in the state between July 2019 and April 2020. For a complete listing of dates and locations, visit njhumanities.org.

Public Scholars Project

February 8, 2020 at 2:00 PM | South Plainfield, NJ | South Plainfield Public Library

Rosa Parks: First Lady of Civil Rights

On a December day in 1955, this tired seamstress and NAACP secretary refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery Alabama Bus. Rosa Parks' story will serve to remind all who hear it that we cannot always stand by and observe the status quo. We all bear the responsibility to bring about the changes that will help "We the People..." form that "...more Perfect Union" that is our Nation's promise.

Alex Ford
First Person Interpreter


Public Scholars Project

February 8, 2020 at 11:00 AM | Waretown, NJ | Ocean County Library, Waretown Branch

Martin Luther King Jr.: "A Man of Conscience"

Martin Luther King Jr. was one of the world’s greatest orators, as well as a pastor, activist, and humanitarian. He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 for his work combating racial inequality through the use of nonviolent civil disobedience. His most famous speech, (“I Have a Dream”) was first delivered at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963.

Keith Henley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 9, 2020 at 3:00 PM | Pennington, NJ | Pennington Borough Hall

Go, van Gogh!

At one point, Vincent van Gogh wrote to his brother that since he had no children, he viewed his paintings as his progeny. A painter and pastor, van Gogh produced more than 2,000 “brilliant children.” In this session, dozens of his works of art, with a focus on pieces at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, will be explored. An overview of his life experiences and how it influenced his art will lead to a lively discussion, which will include talking about the differences between experiencing original artwork and reproductions.

Michael Norris, Ph.D.
Art Historian

Grantee Events

February 9, 2020 at 2:00 PM | Morristown, NJ | Morris Museum

Blessed Be the Tie that Binds

Event: What Freedom Looks Like: Anchoring African American Identities in Morris County from 1600 to 2020

Public Scholars Project

February 9, 2020 at 2:00 PM | Ewing, NJ | Ewing Township Historic Preservation Society (Benjamin Temple House)

Reclaiming Our Voice: New Jersey’s Central Role in the Fight for Women's Suffrage

Lillian Feickert, president of the NJ Woman Suffrage Association from 1912-1920, was committed to the fight for women’s suffrage. Many do not realize the role that New Jersey played in the suffrage movement. During this PSP session, Feickert explores more about why some NJ women once had the vote and then lost it for over a century. Also, she shares stories about how nationally-known suffrage advocates Lucy Stone and Elizabeth Cady Stanton staged tax and voting protests in the state. Feickert describes how Alice Paul became the dynamo who re-energized the push for a federal amendment and how Dr. Florence Spearing Randolph brought black women into the movement. Participants will learn that women were not “given” the vote, but fought for it for generations.

Carol Simon Levin
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

February 10, 2020 at 7:30 PM | Leonia, NJ | Leonia High School

Reclaiming Our Voice: New Jersey’s Central Role in the Fight for Women's Suffrage

Lillian Feickert, president of the NJ Woman Suffrage Association from 1912-1920, was committed to the fight for women’s suffrage. Many do not realize the role that New Jersey played in the suffrage movement. During this PSP session, Feickert explores more about why some NJ women once had the vote and then lost it for over a century. Also, she shares stories about how nationally-known suffrage advocates Lucy Stone and Elizabeth Cady Stanton staged tax and voting protests in the state. Feickert describes how Alice Paul became the dynamo who re-energized the push for a federal amendment and how Dr. Florence Spearing Randolph brought black women into the movement. Participants will learn that women were not “given” the vote, but fought for it for generations.

Carol Simon Levin
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

February 10, 2020 at 6:00 PM | Surf City, NJ | Ocean County Library, Long Beach Island Branch

Langston Hughes: I Too…Have a Song to Sing

Jazz poet and social activist Langston Hughes utilized the American language, music, slang, and religious views to educate the world about African American lifestyles during the Harlem Renaissance. His jazz poetry depicted the "low-life," or the real life experiences of blacks, in the lower social-economic strata. His criticisms focused on the divisions, and prejudices, based on skin color within the black community. In this program, participants will explore one it means to be oneself and how Hughes used his poetry to share messages of experiences.

Keith Henley
First Person Interpreter

NJCH Events

February 11, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Clinton, NJ | Red Mill Museum Village

What is your water story?

The great state of New Jersey is shaped by water, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Raritan River, Lake Hopatcong to the Delaware Bay. Our lives, just like our geography, are shaped by water too. Recreation and travel (ever spent time at the Jersey shore?), water management and delivery infrastructure in our own communities (ever flushed a toilet?), and economic impact and transportation (ever purchased something from overseas?) – just like turning on the kitchen faucet, it’s all a part of our every day.

As part of building a statewide water story archive, NJCH is asking residents to reflect upon and share their perspectives and memories about water. We are hosting these hour-long public discussions in every county of the state (June 2019 – April 2020) to capture stories about the different ways water matters to New Jerseyans. What New Jersey water source or waterway is most meaningful to you? How do you want to preserve such resources for the future? Why? We want to know!

Each community conversation invites participants to share and/or listen and to meaningful memories and experiences of water in New Jersey. Participants will have the opportunity to contribute their water story to a statewide public archive documenting personal connections to water and waterways in New Jersey.

Why join the discussion?

- Your voice matters – contribute your water story to the archive for future generations.
- No prior preparation is needed to attend, and all are welcome to share or listen.
- Explore the connective role of water among diverse New Jersey communities.
- We rarely dedicate time and space to dive into dialogue about our most vital resource.
- Documentation of what water sources we value is critical for ensuring their protection.
- Everyone has a water story. What's yours?

What’s your water story? will be hosted in every county in the state between July 2019 and April 2020. For a complete listing of dates and locations, visit njhumanities.org.

Public Scholars Project

February 13, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Mountainside, NJ | Trailside Nature and Science Center

Rosa Parks: First Lady of Civil Rights

On a December day in 1955, this tired seamstress and NAACP secretary refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery Alabama Bus. Rosa Parks' story will serve to remind all who hear it that we cannot always stand by and observe the status quo. We all bear the responsibility to bring about the changes that will help "We the People..." form that "...more Perfect Union" that is our Nation's promise.

Alex Ford
First Person Interpreter


Grantee Events

February 15, 2020 at 1:00 PM | Tennent, NJ | Paterson Museum

Grassroots Arts Commission Revival Project

The commission would like to both meet you and get your input on which Arts programs we are wanted in Paterson. Facilitated by Talena Lachelle Queen.

NJCH Events

February 16, 2020 at 3:00 PM | Pennington, NJ | The Watershed Institute

What is your water story?

The great state of New Jersey is shaped by water, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Raritan River, Lake Hopatcong to the Delaware Bay. Our lives, just like our geography, are shaped by water too. Recreation and travel (ever spent time at the Jersey shore?), water management and delivery infrastructure in our own communities (ever flushed a toilet?), and economic impact and transportation (ever purchased something from overseas?) – just like turning on the kitchen faucet, it’s all a part of our every day.

As part of building a statewide water story archive, NJCH is asking residents to reflect upon and share their perspectives and memories about water. We are hosting these hour-long public discussions in every county of the state (June 2019 – April 2020) to capture stories about the different ways water matters to New Jerseyans. What New Jersey water source or waterway is most meaningful to you? How do you want to preserve such resources for the future? Why? We want to know!

Each community conversation invites participants to share and/or listen and to meaningful memories and experiences of water in New Jersey. Participants will have the opportunity to contribute their water story to a statewide public archive documenting personal connections to water and waterways in New Jersey.

Why join the discussion?

- Your voice matters – contribute your water story to the archive for future generations.
- No prior preparation is needed to attend, and all are welcome to share or listen.
- Explore the connective role of water among diverse New Jersey communities.
- We rarely dedicate time and space to dive into dialogue about our most vital resource.
- Documentation of what water sources we value is critical for ensuring their protection.
- Everyone has a water story. What's yours?

What’s your water story? will be hosted in every county in the state between July 2019 and April 2020. For a complete listing of dates and locations, visit njhumanities.org.

NJCH Events

February 18, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Asbury, NJ | Musconetcong Watershed Association

What is your water story?

The great state of New Jersey is shaped by water, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Raritan River, Lake Hopatcong to the Delaware Bay. Our lives, just like our geography, are shaped by water too. Recreation and travel (ever spent time at the Jersey shore?), water management and delivery infrastructure in our own communities (ever flushed a toilet?), and economic impact and transportation (ever purchased something from overseas?) – just like turning on the kitchen faucet, it’s all a part of our every day.

As part of building a statewide water story archive, NJCH is asking residents to reflect upon and share their perspectives and memories about water. We are hosting these hour-long public discussions in every county of the state (June 2019 – April 2020) to capture stories about the different ways water matters to New Jerseyans. What New Jersey water source or waterway is most meaningful to you? How do you want to preserve such resources for the future? Why? We want to know!

Each community conversation invites participants to share and/or listen and to meaningful memories and experiences of water in New Jersey. Participants will have the opportunity to contribute their water story to a statewide public archive documenting personal connections to water and waterways in New Jersey.

Why join the discussion?

- Your voice matters – contribute your water story to the archive for future generations.
- No prior preparation is needed to attend, and all are welcome to share or listen.
- Explore the connective role of water among diverse New Jersey communities.
- We rarely dedicate time and space to dive into dialogue about our most vital resource.
- Documentation of what water sources we value is critical for ensuring their protection.
- Everyone has a water story. What's yours?

What’s your water story? will be hosted in every county in the state between July 2019 and April 2020. For a complete listing of dates and locations, visit njhumanities.org.

Public Scholars Project

February 19, 2020 at 12:00 PM | Trenton, NJ | New Jersey State Library

Why Wench Betty's Story Matters: The Murder of a NJ Slave in 1784

Wench Betty was murdered in 1784. The subsequent court proceedings for her murder were held that year too. How does exploring her murder today provide insight into the lives of enslaved African Americans during the early American Republic? Often, the lives of enslaved people's in this period are disregarded. This PSP session will educate participants about the state of slavery in New Jersey at the time of Wench Betty's death and provide an opportunity to explore the powerful revolutionary war ideas of freedom and liberty at a time when slavery still existed in the state’s History. Through an examination of court documents and slave records, participants will more deeply understand more about Wench Betty’s life and all the ways it mattered.

Sue Kozel
Public Historian

Public Scholars Project

February 20, 2020 at 1:00 PM | Marlboro, NJ | Monmouth County Library, Marlboro Branch

The Color Line on the Baseball Diamond

Have you considered the black part of the nation’s favorite pastime? What black baseball in America meant, including pioneers like Jackie Robinson and the rich relationships in “Blackball” during America’s era of segregation, across the nation and in New Jersey is a multifaceted narrative. During this session, a robust conversation, an account by a veteran Negro Leaguer, a rendition of an "iconic" baseball poem "K.C at the Bat" by its author, Kevin Kane, and selections from the documentary “Before You Can Say Jackie Robinson” will further participants’ understanding.

Lawrence Hogan, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of History at Union County College

Grant Deadlines

February 20, 2020 at 10:00 AM | East Orange, NJ | East Orange Public Library

NJCH Workshop, North Jersey: Creating an Outstanding Proposal

To register, visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/njch-workshop-north-jersey-creating-an-outstanding-proposal-tickets-93598001141

This workshop will be held at the East Orange Public Library.

The strongest grant proposals use both their narrative and their budget to tell a compelling story. Learn how to craft a competitive grant proposal in this blended coaching session and writing workshop. Ideal for anyone in the process of applying for an NJCH grant, but open to anyone who wants to learn how to write an effective grant proposal.

Led by Director of Grants & Programs Gigi Naglak, participants can expect an interactive workshop that will include dedicated writing time.

All participants should review the Grants section of njhumanities.org prior to the workshop and prepare notes or an outline about their potential humanities project.

Grantee Events

February 20, 2020 at 5:00 PM | Paterson, NJ | The Art Factory

Grassroots Arts Commission Revival Project

Meet the commissioners and give your input on Arts Programs in Paterson. Facilitated by Talena Lachelle Queen.

Public Scholars Project

February 20, 2020 at 6:30 PM | Pleasantville, NJ | Atlantic County Library, Pleasantville Branch

Martin Luther King Jr.: "A Man of Conscience"

Martin Luther King Jr. was one of the world’s greatest orators, as well as a pastor, activist, and humanitarian. He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 for his work combating racial inequality through the use of nonviolent civil disobedience. His most famous speech, (“I Have a Dream”) was first delivered at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963.

Keith Henley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 22, 2020 at 2:00 PM | Jackson, NJ | Ocean County Library, Jackson Branch

Oney Judge, Martha Washington's Slave

Did you know that Oney Judge lived as fugitive for 52 years? Oney Judge was a slave that belonged to President and Lady Washington. A dower slave, owned by the estate of Martha Washington’s first husband, Oney could not expect to be freed by George Washington’s will. When Oney learned that Martha Washington intended to offer her as a wedding present to her granddaughter, and that Oney’s transfer back to the south was imminent, Oney created a plan – one that would label her a fugitive - and carried it out in 1796 by escaping north to New Hampshire. Participants will learn more about her life and her experiences.

Alex Ford
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 22, 2020 at 2:00 PM | Ocean Grove, NJ | Ocean Grove Historic Preservation (Jersey Shore Arts Center)

Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Satire

For decades, countless American women fought for the right to vote. But many others—like the costumed fictional Anti-Suffragist portrayed in this program—fought against it. Written by pro-Suffragist Marie Jenney Howe in 1912, this witty, insightful satire sheds light on some of the apparently absurd arguments offered by those opposed to the Suffragist movement. Anti arguments like “If given the ballot, would she destroy civilization by voting with—or by voting against !—her own husband ?” will be explored, while insight about the sociological, historical, and political context informs the arguments against Suffrage.

Michèle LaRue
First Person Interpreter

Grant Deadlines

February 25, 2020 at 10:15 AM | Maple Shade, NJ | Maple Shade Township Municipal Complex

NJCH Workshop, South Jersey: Creating an Outstanding Proposal

To register, visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/njch-workshop-south-jersey-creating-an-outstanding-proposal-tickets-93598655097

This workshop will be held at the Maple Shade Township Municipal Complex.

The strongest grant proposals use both their narrative and their budget to tell a compelling story. Learn how to craft a competitive grant proposal in this blended coaching session and writing workshop. Ideal for anyone in the process of applying for an NJCH grant, but open to anyone who wants to learn how to write an effective grant proposal.

Led by Director of Grants & Programs Gigi Naglak, participants can expect an interactive workshop that will include dedicated writing time.

All participants should review the Grants section of njhumanities.org prior to the workshop and prepare notes or an outline about their potential humanities project.

Public Scholars Project

February 27, 2020 at 7:00 PM | Scotch Plains, NJ | Scotch Plains Public Library

Why Wench Betty's Story Matters: The Murder of a NJ Slave in 1784

Wench Betty was murdered in 1784. The subsequent court proceedings for her murder were held that year too. How does exploring her murder today provide insight into the lives of enslaved African Americans during the early American Republic? Often, the lives of enslaved people's in this period are disregarded. This PSP session will educate participants about the state of slavery in New Jersey at the time of Wench Betty's death and provide an opportunity to explore the powerful revolutionary war ideas of freedom and liberty at a time when slavery still existed in the state’s History. Through an examination of court documents and slave records, participants will more deeply understand more about Wench Betty’s life and all the ways it mattered.

Sue Kozel
Public Historian

Public Scholars Project

February 28, 2020 at 2:00 PM | New Egypt, NJ | Ocean County Library, Plumsted Branch

How the Gullah Retain their Roots

How have the Gullah/Geechee, a population of African Americans in South Carolina and Georgia, held tight to their African cultural roots beyond other African Americans in the US? This distinction results from the preservation of the folklore and oral traditions by the Gullah. Through an examination of music and selected texts, participants will discuss their impression of “Gullah” and “Geechee” and the folklore, values, and ideals associated with them. Moreover, the challenges and rewards of preserving traditional cultures, in general, will be explored.

Ada McKenzie Thomas, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of World Literature at Bloomfield College

Public Scholars Project

February 29, 2020 at 2:00 PM | Union, NJ | Union Free Public Library

The Color Line on the Baseball Diamond

Have you considered the black part of the nation’s favorite pastime? What black baseball in America meant, including pioneers like Jackie Robinson and the rich relationships in “Blackball” during America’s era of segregation, across the nation and in New Jersey is a multifaceted narrative. During this session, a robust conversation, an account by a veteran Negro Leaguer, a rendition of an "iconic" baseball poem "K.C at the Bat" by its author, Kevin Kane, and selections from the documentary “Before You Can Say Jackie Robinson” will further participants’ understanding.

Lawrence Hogan, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of History at Union County College

Public Scholars Project

February 29, 2020 at 10:30 AM | Plainfield, NJ | Plainfield Public Library

Dismantling the Racism Machine: What White People Are Not Taught about White Supremacy

What are some key myths that white people are taught that perpetuate systemic racism? There is a false but popular belief that race, including whiteness, is biological when it’s actually an invention, an idea that was created during colonial America. Exploring the concepts from Karen’s new book Dismantling the Racism Machine: A Manual and Toolbox, participants will look at how the public understands—and doesn’t understand—race and racism.

Karen Gaffney, Ph.D.
Professor of English, Raritan Valley Community College

Public Scholars Project

February 29, 2020 at 1:00 PM | Paterson, NJ | Paterson Museum

Why Wench Betty's Story Matters: The Murder of a NJ Slave in 1784

Wench Betty was murdered in 1784. The subsequent court proceedings for her murder were held that year too. How does exploring her murder today provide insight into the lives of enslaved African Americans during the early American Republic? Often, the lives of enslaved people's in this period are disregarded. This PSP session will educate participants about the state of slavery in New Jersey at the time of Wench Betty's death and provide an opportunity to explore the powerful revolutionary war ideas of freedom and liberty at a time when slavery still existed in the state’s History. Through an examination of court documents and slave records, participants will more deeply understand more about Wench Betty’s life and all the ways it mattered.

Sue Kozel
Public Historian