Events for June 2019

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Public Scholars Project

June 1, 2019 at 12:00 PM | Laurel Springs, NJ | Whitman Stafford Farmhouse

Walt Whitman: "The Good Grey Poet"

Whitman sought to create “a new gospel of beauty”: a uniquely American voice. He escaped the Classic Structures demanded of verse, and gave us the free form voice that has become standard today. Whitman, a volunteer in military hospitals during the civil war, mourned the assassination of President Lincoln with the well-known “Oh Captain! My Captain!” His last days were spent in Camden, NJ and in his refuge in nature at the Stafford Farm and Timber Creek.

David Scott Taylor
First Person Interpreter

Grantee Events

June 1, 2019 - June 30, 2019 | Woodbury, NJ | Made Artisan Studio

A Time for Change

This traveling exhibit from the African American Heritage Museum of Southern New Jersey details the role of New Jersey citizens in the Civil Rights movement. Free and self-guided.

Public Scholars Project

June 5, 2019 at 12:15 PM | East Brunswick, NJ | East Brunswick Senior Center

The World Changed, so Did the Music

Did Prohibition change the music of the 1920s? And did the Cold War impact the music of the 1950s? Yes, music - concert and popular - music was influenced by the technological and political changes. From the late 1800s to today, the times have shaped what and how American hear and experience opera, concert works, musicals, jazz, country and folk music, and rock and roll. In this session, participants can tune into a discussion about the sounds, aesthetics, and auras of each decade in the modern era.

Robert W. Butts, Ph.D.
Conductor & Educator

Public Scholars Project

June 6, 2019 at 5:30 PM | Egg Harbor City, NJ | Atlantic County Library, Egg Harbor City Branch

Suspect Number 1: The Criminalization of Black Men in the Media

It’s time to talk about the way that black men are portrayed in the media. In early film and television, black characters were strictly categorized. From brutal savages to submissives, from characters of comic fodder to lazy subhuman creatures, the typical black man was only presented in specific and offensive ways. Fast forward to the new millennium and black men are often portrayed as criminals and thugs. This has contributed to the perceptions of black men as “Suspect Number 1.” In this session, participants will explore these stereotypical portrayals and discuss how this affects bias against black men in society.

Donnetrice C. Allison, Ph.D.
Professor of Communication Studies and Africana Studies at Stockton University

Public Scholars Project

June 6, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Basking Ridge, NJ | Bernards Township Library

Theodore Roosevelt: “American in the Arena”

Bringing his vigorous persona (and his boisterous family) to the White House, “TR” helped catapult the U.S. into a new century. War hero to Nobel Peace Prize winner, naturalist to imperialist, The 26th President promoted progressive reform and stronger government control of business. Believing that the security of the American People would be achieved through leadership on the World Stage, President Roosevelt expanded U.S. influence around the globe.

Peyton Dixon
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

June 8, 2019 at 11:00 AM | Medford, NJ | Medford Leas Theater

Islam in/and America

In your eyes, what does it mean to be Muslim? How has the media and popular culture influenced how you see Muslims and Islam? In this session, participants will examine the history and presence of Islam in the United States, and the construction and evolution of U.S. Muslim identity, community, and culture from the colonial era to the present. The incredible racial and ethnic heterogeneity of American Muslim communities; the myriad of ways that Muslim practice (or do not practice) Islam; and how "Muslim" intersects with racial/ethnic categories such as "Arab," "Asian," and "Black” will all be explored through open, guided conversation.

Sylvia Chan-Malik, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor in the Departments of American and Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University

Community Events

June 11, 2019 at 9:00 AM | , | The Palace at Somerset Park

NJ Conference for the Social Sector - Census 2020 - Defining the Next 10 Years

The 2020 Census is coming and it counts — in more ways than one.

The Census isn’t just a population tally. State and local governments, businesses, nonprofits and foundations, rely on Census data to allocate funding, define where services are delivered, and promote economic development. The information is valuable for health care, education, housing, transportation, and business. It helps determine congressional representation, political participation, and other fundamentals of community wellbeing and American democracy.

To register for this event, visit www.cnjg.org

Grant Deadlines

June 12, 2019 | Trenton, NJ | New Jersey Council for the Humanities

2019 Incubation Grant (Round 2) Draft Deadline (optional)

Invited applicants may submit one draft for review by June 7, 2019.

To learn more visit: http://njhumanities.org/grants.

Public Scholars Project

June 13, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Highland Park, NJ | Highland Park Public Library

The Life and Writing of James Baldwin

The influence of writer and social critic James Baldwin reached far and wide. In this unique exploration of Baldwin’s groundbreaking literary and social justice work, actor/comic Grant Cooper and scholar Dr. Lindsey Swindall engage participants in an interactive dialogue that unravels the truths of racism in this country and examines other themes in Baldwin’s writings. Mr. Cooper’s dramatic interpretations of Baldwin’s writing are complemented by historical context from Dr. Swindall, leading to thought provoking questions that spark audience participation.

Lindsey Swindall, Ph.D. & Grant Cooper
Educator at Stevens Institute of Technology & Comedian

Public Scholars Project

June 19, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Cherry Hill, NJ | Cherry Hill Public Library

The Life and Writing of James Baldwin

The influence of writer and social critic James Baldwin reached far and wide. In this unique exploration of Baldwin’s groundbreaking literary and social justice work, actor/comic Grant Cooper and scholar Dr. Lindsey Swindall engage participants in an interactive dialogue that unravels the truths of racism in this country and examines other themes in Baldwin’s writings. Mr. Cooper’s dramatic interpretations of Baldwin’s writing are complemented by historical context from Dr. Swindall, leading to thought provoking questions that spark audience participation.

Lindsey Swindall, Ph.D. & Grant Cooper
Educator at Stevens Institute of Technology & Comedian

Public Scholars Project

June 19, 2019 at 7:00 PM | West Milford, NJ | West Milford Township Library

George Washington Remembers New Jersey

Washington was no stranger to New Jersey. From Trenton to Princeton to Morristown to Monmouth to Middlebrook, (and more), the General spent more time here than in any other state. Join General Washington as he reminisces about his brightest and darkest moments during the battles and encampments of the “Cockpit of the Revolution.” In this session, participants will learn more about New Jersey's role in the American Revolution from the perspective of George Washington.

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

June 19, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Bernardsville, NJ | Bernardsville Public Library

Springsteen and his Layered Lyrics

Bruce Springsteen expects attentiveness of his listeners. How do we know this? Over the past 50 years, Springsteen has written songs and created music that have been experienced by countless fans. But many don’t know the extent to which his work has been influenced by the American folk tradition. Through experimental reinterpretation and the creation of new traditions, The Boss has worked within known folk traditions, but at the same time, created new sounds and messages. In this session, participants can learn about some of the works that have influenced one of Jersey’s most celebrated musical artists.

Prudence Jones, Ph.D.
Professor at Montclair University

Public Scholars Project

June 19, 2019 at 7:30 PM | Buena, NJ | Buena Vista Township Hall

The Fiddle in America: A History and Demonstration

How often do you get to hear music and then have a high-energy conversation about its role in historical traditions, its cultural influence, and its style and technique? Until the early twentieth century, the fiddle was the centerpiece of American folk music and folk culture. In this interactive session, Backes explores the origins and history of American fiddle music—covering a range of styles and modes of expression—and raises along the way big questions about musical tradition and music making.

Matthew Backes, Ph.D.
American Studies at Rutgers University

Grant Deadlines

June 27, 2019 | Trenton, NJ | New Jersey Council for the Humanities

2019 Incubation Grant (Round 2) Application Deadline (required)

Final applications must be submitted through our online system by the 11:59 p.m. on June 20, 2019. Materials submitted late will not be considered.

To learn more visit: http://njhumanities.org/grants.

Public Scholars Project

June 27, 2019 at 6:00 PM | Edison, NJ | Chugh, LLP

The Missing Stories

In 1883, Anandibai Joshee, a young woman from a small city in western India arrived in Roselle, New Jersey. She had traveled thousands of miles, overcoming incredible physical and emotional hardships. She arrived with a purpose and eventually became the first South Asian woman in the world with a degree in western medicine. South Asians have been a presence in the US for more than 130 years, but their stories are mostly unknown. In this session, participants will engage in an interactive discussion about underepresented populations, specifically examining South Asians, and how sharing community stories can help create a more inclusive future.

Samip Mallick
Co-Founder and Executive Director of SAADA