Events for May 2019

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Grant Deadlines

May 1, 2019 - May 24, 2019 | Trenton, NJ | New Jersey Council for the Humanities

2019 Incubation Grant (Round 2) Intent to Apply period (required)

Potential applications are required to submit an Intent to Apply though our online application system by May 24, 2019.

To learn more visit: https://njhumanities.org/grants.

Public Scholars Project

May 1, 2019 at 1:30 PM | Pitman, NJ | United Methodist Communities at Pitman

Annie Oakley: "Aim for a High Mark"

Annie Oakley, a diminutive sharpshooter and exhibition shooter, competed in a sport and in a world dominated by men. She felt strongly that women were just as capable as men and insisted that they should strive to achieve any goal or occupation that interested them. Her motto was to “Aim for a high mark…for practice will make you perfect.” and her hope was that all women would reach the “Bulls-eye of Success.”

Kim Hanley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

May 2, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Fair Lawn, NJ | Maurice M. Pine Free Public Library

Black Comedy: No Tears, Just Politics

What pairs well with civil rights activism in the African American community? In this PSP session, it’s comedy. Drawing upon the comedic talent of Grant Cooper, who has been a stand-up comic in NYC for over twenty years, and the historical insight of African American Studies scholar Dr. Lindsey Swindall, Black Comedy brings unique insight about politics and the arts to audiences, including an examination of the historical AND contemporary significance of the intersection between civil rights activism and comedy. Participants will explore how comedy can be effective in breaking down barriers and sparking fruitful discussion.

Lindsey Swindall, Ph.D. & Grant Cooper
Educator at Stevens Institute of Technology & Comedian

Public Scholars Project

May 4, 2019 at 11:00 AM | Freehold, NJ | First United Methodist Church, Freehold

Maizie Brews a Tea Business

What if it was 1925 and you wanted to open a Tea Room? What if you were a…woman that wanted to open a business? In this dramatic presentation, Maizie Stanton will explain how her husband reacted and what she needed to do to prepare for this undertaking. During this PSP session, the challenges faced by women who were stepping out of their homes and into the business world will be explored. Participants will engage in a lively discussion about the Tea Room craze and the evolution of women as entrepreneurs.

Maureen O'Connor Leach
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

May 6, 2019 at 7:30 PM | Wayne, NJ | Our Lady of Consolation Amity Club

Springsteen and his Layered Lyrics

Bruce Springsteen expects attentiveness of his listeners. How do we know this? Over the past 50 years, Springsteen has written songs and created music that have been experienced by countless fans. But many don’t know the extent to which his work has been influenced by the American folk tradition. Through experimental reinterpretation and the creation of new traditions, The Boss has worked within known folk traditions, but at the same time, created new sounds and messages. In this session, participants can learn about some of the works that have influenced one of Jersey’s most celebrated musical artists.

Prudence Jones, Ph.D.
Professor at Montclair University

Public Scholars Project

May 7, 2019 at 1:00 PM | New Vernon, NJ | Kemmerer Library-Harding Township

Living and Laughing by The Chopsticks-Fork Principle

From a place of delight and good humor, the Chopsticks-Fork Principle encourages people to realize and understand (and laugh about) how we are all at least bi-cultural in a way that shatters stereotypes yet explains the generalizations. The talk is an invitation to first wonder “Can the Tooth Fairy survive the Melting Pot?” “Can you fail or succeed simultaneously in two cultures?” and “What happens when you have a sub-conscious but your (grand)mother doesn’t?” and then to explore how the discussion help listeners re-think their own cultural heritages.

Cathy Bao Bean
Chair, Society for Values in Higher Education

Public Scholars Project

May 11, 2019 at 3:00 PM | Bloomfield, NJ | Bloomfield Public Library

What’s funny about the Jersey Joke?

New Jersey has long been the whipping boy of New York City (and maybe Philly too). Decades ago, Woody Allen movies and Saturday Night Live amplified Jersey’s inferiority complex. This phenomenon, the Jersey Joke, started to turn in the mid 70’s when Bruce Springsteen gained national fame. The Jersey Joke continued to ebb and flow (consider how the Sopranos changed how Jersey was perceived) and still does. Jersey is a state like no other, the home of high profile innovators and artists – from Edison to Sinatra – and can boast national economic and scientific impact. And let’s not forget about its glorious tollbooths.

Michael Rockland, Ph.D.
Professor & Writer

Public Scholars Project

May 13, 2019 at 7:30 PM | Pt Pleasant Beach, NJ | Point Pleasant Borough Hall

Theodore Roosevelt: “American in the Arena”

Bringing his vigorous persona (and his boisterous family) to the White House, “TR” helped catapult the U.S. into a new century. War hero to Nobel Peace Prize winner, naturalist to imperialist, The 26th President promoted progressive reform and stronger government control of business. Believing that the security of the American People would be achieved through leadership on the World Stage, President Roosevelt expanded U.S. influence around the globe.

Peyton Dixon
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

May 13, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Mullica Hill, NJ | Gloucester County Library, Mullica Hill Branch

What’s all this about “fake news”?

The web creates an ideal environment for news and other content to spread like wildfire. Propaganda has existed as long as language itself; and yet “fake news” seems somehow different. Is it? The digital world has changed how we give and receive information. But how do we track the origin and assess the legitimacy of the information that we receive? In order to effectively read and evaluate sources, we can develop awareness about how they reach us and how we read them. In this session, participants will examine fake news and ways to evaluate the kinds of sites, technologies, and processes that participate in circulating falsehoods online.

Jason Luther, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Writing Arts, Rowan University

Public Scholars Project

May 14, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Bogota, NJ | Bogota Public Library

The Ark, the Grail, and the Quest for Discovery

Each Indiana Jones adventure transports us to places of high adventure and intrigue, where the secrets of earlier times are discovered one clue at a time. Archaeologists dig up the past and we are often fascinated with what is uncovered. Why? Through a look at the history and legend of the Ark of the Covenant and the Holy Grail, participants can learn about how archaeology helps us to learn about the past as well as why we are so captivated by digging it up.

Christopher M. Bellitto, Ph.D.
Professor of History at Kean University

Public Scholars Project

May 15, 2019 at 7:30 PM | Atlantic Highlands, NJ | Strauss Mansion

Memorials Go Up, Memorials Come Down

The events in Charlottesville during the summer of 2017 have prompted even more consideration about memorials and what they represent. When it comes to memorials, heritage and events are political and often reflected in the monuments that are erected. As ideologies change, groups become more or less powerful in privileging the commemorated, or as new information comes to light, new monuments are created and/or old ones are removed. In this session, the politics of and public response to memorials will be examined through numerous lens.

Barbara Seater, Ph.D.
Professor at Raritan Valley Community College

Grant Deadlines

May 16, 2019 at 1:00 PM | Mullica Hill, NJ |

Workshop: Incubation Grants

*NOTE - The time of this workshop has changed to 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM.

To register, visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/workshop-njch-incubation-grants-tickets-59441700727

This workshop will be held at the Mullica Hill Branch of the Gloucester County Library System.

Whether you are planning a new program or reimagining an existing one, Incubation Grants help you plan and develop programs. This workshop will help you understand the ins and outs of an Incubation Grant application…including why knowing exactly what you want to do is not going to benefit your proposal.

Public Scholars Project

May 16, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Old Bridge, NJ | Old Bridge Public Library

From Shtetl to Ghetto: Jewish Women on the Lower East Side

How did life in the shtetls of Eastern Europe prepare Jewish women for life in the New World? Even though they were two very different worlds, there were some significant similarities. In the shtetls Jewish women worked to support their families, spoke the native language as well as Yiddish, were familiar with the marketplace and interacted with gentiles. This discussion explores how, in America, these women profited from more opportunities but suffered in their personal lives.

Leslie Fishbein, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of American Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

May 18, 2019 at 6:00 PM | Freehold, NJ | St. Peter's Church

The Missing Stories

In 1883, Anandibai Joshee, a young woman from a small city in western India arrived in Roselle, New Jersey. She had traveled thousands of miles, overcoming incredible physical and emotional hardships. She arrived with a purpose and eventually became the first South Asian woman in the world with a degree in western medicine. South Asians have been a presence in the US for more than 130 years, but their stories are mostly unknown. In this session, participants will engage in an interactive discussion about underepresented populations, specifically examining South Asians, and how sharing community stories can help create a more inclusive future.

Samip Mallick
Co-Founder and Executive Director of SAADA

Public Scholars Project

May 19, 2019 at 12:30 PM | Morristown, NJ | Temple B'nai Or

What’s all this about “fake news”?

The web creates an ideal environment for news and other content to spread like wildfire. Propaganda has existed as long as language itself; and yet “fake news” seems somehow different. Is it? The digital world has changed how we give and receive information. But how do we track the origin and assess the legitimacy of the information that we receive? In order to effectively read and evaluate sources, we can develop awareness about how they reach us and how we read them. In this session, participants will examine fake news and ways to evaluate the kinds of sites, technologies, and processes that participate in circulating falsehoods online.

Jason Luther, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Writing Arts, Rowan University

Public Scholars Project

May 19, 2019 at 10:00 AM | North Brunswick, NJ | 4H Indian Langoor Club

The Missing Stories

In 1883, Anandibai Joshee, a young woman from a small city in western India arrived in Roselle, New Jersey. She had traveled thousands of miles, overcoming incredible physical and emotional hardships. She arrived with a purpose and eventually became the first South Asian woman in the world with a degree in western medicine. South Asians have been a presence in the US for more than 130 years, but their stories are mostly unknown. In this session, participants will engage in an interactive discussion about underepresented populations, specifically examining South Asians, and how sharing community stories can help create a more inclusive future.

Samip Mallick
Co-Founder and Executive Director of SAADA

Public Scholars Project

May 19, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Plainfield, NJ | Historical Society of Plainfield (Drake House Museum)

‘Ere the Shadows Fade: New Jersey’s Civil War Era Photographers

Why were photographers important during the Civil War Era? The then-new ability to capture images at that time resulted in an increase in demand – from soldiers and families – for images of loved ones. More galleries opened and photographers moved to areas in need during and post war. Several notable New Jersey photographers, including George S. Cook and Theodore Gubelman contributed to the field. In this session, the evolution of the photography industry and the significance of the images captured will guide the conversation.

Gary D. Saretzky
Archivist, educator, and photographer

Public Scholars Project

May 20, 2019 at 5:00 PM | Vineland, NJ | Vineland Public Library

Black Comedy: No Tears, Just Politics

What pairs well with civil rights activism in the African American community? In this PSP session, it’s comedy. Drawing upon the comedic talent of Grant Cooper, who has been a stand-up comic in NYC for over twenty years, and the historical insight of African American Studies scholar Dr. Lindsey Swindall, Black Comedy brings unique insight about politics and the arts to audiences, including an examination of the historical AND contemporary significance of the intersection between civil rights activism and comedy. Participants will explore how comedy can be effective in breaking down barriers and sparking fruitful discussion.

Lindsey Swindall, Ph.D. & Grant Cooper
Educator at Stevens Institute of Technology & Comedian

Public Scholars Project

May 21, 2019 at 12:00 PM | Spotswood, NJ | Spotswood Office on Aging and Senior Resource Center

Theodore Roosevelt: “American in the Arena”

Bringing his vigorous persona (and his boisterous family) to the White House, “TR” helped catapult the U.S. into a new century. War hero to Nobel Peace Prize winner, naturalist to imperialist, The 26th President promoted progressive reform and stronger government control of business. Believing that the security of the American People would be achieved through leadership on the World Stage, President Roosevelt expanded U.S. influence around the globe.

Peyton Dixon
First Person Interpreter

Grantee Events

May 22, 2019 at 7:00 PM | East Brunswick, NJ | Baker's Barn

Recitation of Names: Lost Souls Public Memorial Project

Fundraising dinner and presentation for the Lost Souls Public Memorial Project. Presentation will include a recitation of the 177 Lost Souls, who were illegally sent into slavery in the South in 1818, as well as spoken word poetry by New Jersey State Theatre Poet-in-Residence, Glenis Redmond.