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Public Scholars Project

March 1, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Pennington, NJ | Pennington Borough Hall

Annie Oakley: "Aim for a High Mark"

Annie Oakley, a diminutive sharpshooter and exhibition shooter, competed in a sport and in a world dominated by men. She felt strongly that women were just as capable as men and insisted that they should strive to achieve any goal or occupation that interested them. Her motto was to “Aim for a high mark…for practice will make you perfect.” and her hope was that all women would reach the “Bulls-eye of Success.”

Kim Hanley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 5, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Montclair, NJ | Montclair Public Library

The Life and Writing of James Baldwin

The influence of writer and social critic James Baldwin reached far and wide. In this unique exploration of Baldwin’s groundbreaking literary and social justice work, actor/comic Grant Cooper and scholar Dr. Lindsey Swindall engage participants in an interactive dialogue that unravels the truths of racism in this country and examines other themes in Baldwin’s writings. Mr. Cooper’s dramatic interpretations of Baldwin’s writing are complemented by historical context from Dr. Swindall, leading to thought provoking questions that spark audience participation.

Lindsey Swindall, Ph.D. & Grant Cooper
Educator at Stevens Institute of Technology & Comedian

Public Scholars Project

March 5, 2019 at 2:30 PM | Beachwood, NJ | Ocean County Library, Beachwood Branch

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 7, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Jersey City, NJ | Soaring Heights Charter School

Clara Barton: Angel of the Battlefield

Clara Barton was born on December 25, 1821, in Massachusetts. In 1852 she founded one of the first free public schools in New Jersey. During the American Civil War, she headed for the front lines, taking supplies to wounded soldiers and earning the title “Angel of the Battlefield.” She established the first chapter of the American Red Cross. Clara’s example of indomitable strength, dogged determination and boundless good will is a model for all Americans.

Pat Jordan
First Person Interpreter

Grantee Events

March 10, 2019 at 2:00 PM | East Brunswick, NJ | East Brunswick Community Arts Center

Benefit Concert for Lost Souls Public Memorial Project

Benefit concert of jazz, classical, and spiritual styles hosted by the East Brunswick Arts and Culture Commission. Portions of the proceeds will benefit the Lost Souls Public Memorial Project, which is looking to build a memorial to 100 people from New Jersey who were illegally sent into slavery in the South in 1818 in the Township of East Brunswick.

Public Scholars Project

March 10, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Somerset, NJ | Franklin Township Public Library

The Shannachie of Glendunbun Ballybeg: Traditional Celtic Tales

The wit and wisdom, humor and horror, and hubris and humanity of a people are found in their traditional stories. Compelling storyteller David Emerson retells (and embroiders) the colorful and ancient tales of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and Cornwall in a presentation that will “warm, tickle, or chill the heart.”

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

March 11, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Woodbury, NJ | Woodbury Public Library

Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Satire

For decades, countless American women fought for the right to vote. But many others—like the costumed fictional Anti-Suffragist portrayed in this program—fought against it. Written by pro-Suffragist Marie Jenney Howe in 1912, this witty, insightful satire sheds light on some of the apparently absurd arguments offered by those opposed to the Suffragist movement. Anti arguments like “If given the ballot, would she destroy civilization by voting with—or by voting against !—her own husband ?” will be explored, while insight about the sociological, historical, and political context informs the arguments against Suffrage.

Michèle LaRue
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 11, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Woodbridge, NJ | Woodbridge Public Library

Clara Barton: Angel of the Battlefield

Clara Barton was born on December 25, 1821, in Massachusetts. In 1852 she founded one of the first free public schools in New Jersey. During the American Civil War, she headed for the front lines, taking supplies to wounded soldiers and earning the title “Angel of the Battlefield.” She established the first chapter of the American Red Cross. Clara’s example of indomitable strength, dogged determination and boundless good will is a model for all Americans.

Pat Jordan
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 12, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Jersey City, NJ | Apple Tree House

Why We Can’t Put Dystopian Fiction Down

When you read or watched Lord of the Flies or the Hunger Games, how many times did you think to yourself (or maybe say out loud), if I were in that situation, what would I do? Or perhaps you considered bigger thoughts about the response of society in general? Dystopian fiction, especially YA, is often thrilling to read and encourages a look at the world around us and conversations about our own responses to the concept of collapse and survival. In this “book talk,” the odds ARE in your favor for having a fascinating conversation.

Laura Nicosia, Ph.D.
Associate Professor at Montclair State University

Public Scholars Project

March 12, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Basking Ridge, NJ | Bernards Township Library

Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Satire

For decades, countless American women fought for the right to vote. But many others—like the costumed fictional Anti-Suffragist portrayed in this program—fought against it. Written by pro-Suffragist Marie Jenney Howe in 1912, this witty, insightful satire sheds light on some of the apparently absurd arguments offered by those opposed to the Suffragist movement. Anti arguments like “If given the ballot, would she destroy civilization by voting with—or by voting against !—her own husband ?” will be explored, while insight about the sociological, historical, and political context informs the arguments against Suffrage.

Michèle LaRue
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 12, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Long Valley, NJ | Washington Township Free Public Library

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 13, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Swedesboro, NJ | Gloucester County Library, Swedesboro Branch

The Shannachie of Glendunbun Ballybeg: Traditional Celtic Tales

The wit and wisdom, humor and horror, and hubris and humanity of a people are found in their traditional stories. Compelling storyteller David Emerson retells (and embroiders) the colorful and ancient tales of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and Cornwall in a presentation that will “warm, tickle, or chill the heart.”

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

March 14, 2019 at 3:30 PM | Newark, NJ | Newark Public Library, Weequahic Branch

The Life and Writing of James Baldwin

The influence of writer and social critic James Baldwin reached far and wide. In this unique exploration of Baldwin’s groundbreaking literary and social justice work, actor/comic Grant Cooper and scholar Dr. Lindsey Swindall engage participants in an interactive dialogue that unravels the truths of racism in this country and examines other themes in Baldwin’s writings. Mr. Cooper’s dramatic interpretations of Baldwin’s writing are complemented by historical context from Dr. Swindall, leading to thought provoking questions that spark audience participation.

Lindsey Swindall, Ph.D. & Grant Cooper
Educator at Stevens Institute of Technology & Comedian

Public Scholars Project

March 14, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Lakewood, NJ | Georgian Court University

Clara Barton: Angel of the Battlefield

Clara Barton was born on December 25, 1821, in Massachusetts. In 1852 she founded one of the first free public schools in New Jersey. During the American Civil War, she headed for the front lines, taking supplies to wounded soldiers and earning the title “Angel of the Battlefield.” She established the first chapter of the American Red Cross. Clara’s example of indomitable strength, dogged determination and boundless good will is a model for all Americans.

Pat Jordan
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 14, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Summit, NJ | Summit Free Public Library

The Shannachie of Glendunbun Ballybeg: Traditional Celtic Tales

The wit and wisdom, humor and horror, and hubris and humanity of a people are found in their traditional stories. Compelling storyteller David Emerson retells (and embroiders) the colorful and ancient tales of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and Cornwall in a presentation that will “warm, tickle, or chill the heart.”

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Grant Deadlines

March 15, 2019 | Trenton, NJ | New Jersey Council for the Humanities

2019 Action Grant draft submission deadline (optional)

Invited applicants may submit one draft for review by March 15, 2019.

To learn more visit: https://njhumanities.org/grants/action-grants/

Public Scholars Project

March 16, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Jackson, NJ | Ocean County Library, Jackson Branch

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 18, 2019 at 1:00 PM | Ridgewood, NJ | Ridgewood Public Library

The Shannachie of Glendunbun Ballybeg: Traditional Celtic Tales

The wit and wisdom, humor and horror, and hubris and humanity of a people are found in their traditional stories. Compelling storyteller David Emerson retells (and embroiders) the colorful and ancient tales of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and Cornwall in a presentation that will “warm, tickle, or chill the heart.”

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

March 19, 2019 at 1:30 PM | Allentown, NJ | Allentown First Aid Squad Building

The Shannachie of Glendunbun Ballybeg: Traditional Celtic Tales

The wit and wisdom, humor and horror, and hubris and humanity of a people are found in their traditional stories. Compelling storyteller David Emerson retells (and embroiders) the colorful and ancient tales of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and Cornwall in a presentation that will “warm, tickle, or chill the heart.”

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

March 20, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Spring Lake, NJ | Spring Lake Public Library

Harriet Beecher Stowe: Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Dominion of Conscience

In 1852 Harriet Beecher Stowe published “Uncle Tom’s Cabin, or Life Among the Lowly” which helped move the conscience of the country to imperative cause of Abolitionism. Her story energized anti-slavery forces in the North, while provoking widespread anger in the pro-slavery South. Allegedly, when she met Abraham Lincoln, he said, “So you are the little woman that wrote the book that started this great war?”

Kim Hanley
First Person Interpreter

Grant Deadlines

March 21, 2019 at 10:30 AM | Princeton Junction, NJ |

Workshop: Arts & Humanities

To register for this workshop - https://www.eventbrite.com/e/workshop-arts-humanities-tickets-56492990054

This workshop will help you understand the similarities and differences between the arts and the humanities and explore effective partnerships that have led to rich and nuanced programs for both types of organizations.

Public Scholars Project

March 21, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Lawrenceville, NJ | Mercer County Library, Lawrence Headquarters Branch

Women, Feminism, and Islam

How often do you hear the words “Islam” and “feminism” together? Perhaps a better question is – how often should you hear those two words together? Stereotypes and perspectives about Islam sometimes include the notion of the “Poor Muslim Woman” and do not acknowledge any developments in feminism or political activism. In this session, the common notion of the oppression of Islamic women and the movement of Islamic feminism as well as a general discussion of gender and women’s rights will help participants further their understanding of Islam and feminism.

Sylvia Chan-Malik, Ph.D.
Associate Professor in the Departments of American and Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

March 21, 2019 at 2:30 PM | Monroe Township, NJ | Monroe Township Public Library

Go, van Gogh!

At one point, Vincent van Gogh wrote to his brother that since he had no children, he viewed his paintings as his progeny. A painter and pastor, van Gogh produced more than 2,000 “brilliant children.” In this session, dozens of his works of art, with a focus on pieces at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, will be explored. An overview of his life experiences and how it influenced his art will lead to a lively discussion, which will include talking about the differences between experiencing original artwork and reproductions.

Michael Norris, Ph.D.
Art Historian

Public Scholars Project

March 23, 2019 at 1:00 PM | Rochelle Park, NJ | Rochelle Park Public Library

Black Comedy: No Tears, Just Politics

What pairs well with civil rights activism in the African American community? In this PSP session, it’s comedy. Drawing upon the comedic talent of Grant Cooper, who has been a stand-up comic in NYC for over twenty years, and the historical insight of African American Studies scholar Dr. Lindsey Swindall, Black Comedy brings unique insight about politics and the arts to audiences, including an examination of the historical AND contemporary significance of the intersection between civil rights activism and comedy. Participants will explore how comedy can be effective in breaking down barriers and sparking fruitful discussion.

Lindsey Swindall, Ph.D. & Grant Cooper
Educator at Stevens Institute of Technology & Comedian

Public Scholars Project

March 25, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Surf City, NJ | Ocean County Library, Long Beach Island Branch

Women, Feminism, and Islam

How often do you hear the words “Islam” and “feminism” together? Perhaps a better question is – how often should you hear those two words together? Stereotypes and perspectives about Islam sometimes include the notion of the “Poor Muslim Woman” and do not acknowledge any developments in feminism or political activism. In this session, the common notion of the oppression of Islamic women and the movement of Islamic feminism as well as a general discussion of gender and women’s rights will help participants further their understanding of Islam and feminism.

Sylvia Chan-Malik, Ph.D.
Associate Professor in the Departments of American and Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

March 25, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Oakland, NJ | Oakland Public Library

What’s the Verdict?

Each year, the Supreme Court receives 9,000-10,000 case petitions for certiorari (consideration) and less than 1% are reviewed. The cases chosen are signficiant. In this session, participants are encouraged to consider some of the pending cases before the Court. Through an examination of texts and documents participants can, with the guidance of prompting questions, consider and discuss the contemporary political and moral concerns raised by what’s on the Supreme Court docket.

Ian Drake, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Political Science and Jurisprudence at Montclair State University

Grantee Events

March 26, 2019 at 5:30 PM | Camden, NJ | Rutgers University-Camden, Writers House

Letters Home: Writing Workshop for Veterans with Warrior Writers

As part of the Letters Home project, national nonprofit Warrior Writers facilitates a series of free writing workshop for veterans in 2018-19. An experienced facilitator will guide participants through a series of generative writing prompts that engage veterans’ experiences.

All veterans are invited to sign up whether or not they are affiliated with Rutgers.

Public Scholars Project

March 26, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Manchester, NJ | Ocean County Library, Manchester Branch

Over Here, Molly Pitcher

This interpretive storytelling program relates the legend of “Molly Pitcher” (Mary Hays McCauley), the heroine of the 1778 Battle of Monmouth Courthouse – and explores the daily lives of the “women of the army” who followed their husbands to war during the American Revolution. Molly reminisces about when she accompanied her husband through summer battles and winter encampments from Valley Forge to Monmouth to Morristown. Relating her tales of firing a cannon in the heat of battle to trudging “behind the baggage,” she provides a glimpse into what it was like to be a “camp follower” in the days when American independence was a dream rather a certainty.

Stacy Roth
Historical Interpreter and Educator

Public Scholars Project

March 26, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Lawrenceville, NJ | Rider University, Bart Luedeke Center Theater

Women, Feminism, and Islam

How often do you hear the words “Islam” and “feminism” together? Perhaps a better question is – how often should you hear those two words together? Stereotypes and perspectives about Islam sometimes include the notion of the “Poor Muslim Woman” and do not acknowledge any developments in feminism or political activism. In this session, the common notion of the oppression of Islamic women and the movement of Islamic feminism as well as a general discussion of gender and women’s rights will help participants further their understanding of Islam and feminism.

Sylvia Chan-Malik, Ph.D.
Associate Professor in the Departments of American and Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

March 27, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Madison, NJ | Madison Public Library

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 28, 2019 at 1:00 PM | Sparta, NJ | Sparta Public Library

The Wit and Wisdom of Abraham Lincoln

Discover the personal side of Abraham Lincoln. The program covers the great man’s formative years, his courtship and marriage, the beginnings and development of his abolitionist view point, and his first – though not very successful – trip to Congress. Discussion points also include the causes of the Civil War, major events and turning points within the war, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address.

Bob Gleason
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 31, 2019 at 2:00 PM | North Plainfield, NJ | Vermeule Mansion

‘Ere the Shadows Fade: New Jersey’s Civil War Era Photographers

Why were photographers important during the Civil War Era? The then-new ability to capture images at that time resulted in an increase in demand – from soldiers and families – for images of loved ones. More galleries opened and photographers moved to areas in need during and post war. Several notable New Jersey photographers, including George S. Cook and Theodore Gubelman contributed to the field. In this session, the evolution of the photography industry and the significance of the images captured will guide the conversation.

Gary D. Saretzky
Archivist, educator, and photographer