Events for April 2018

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Public Scholars Project

April 4, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Moorestown, NJ | Moorestown Public Library

How New Jersey Photographers Captured Life Through Portraiture

In the 19th century, the world was introduced to the daguerreotype, ambrotype, the tintype, and other photography advancements. Photography exploded and transformed Americans’daily lives. Portraits became commonplace and many New Jersey photographers added to the collective production of images that tell the story of men and women in the 1800s. In this PSP session, images will showcase the photography of the time and enhance the discussion of the impact of photography.

Gary D. Saretzky
Archivist, educator, and photographer

Public Scholars Project

April 4, 2018 at 11:00 AM | Princeton, NJ | Princeton Public Library

Maizie Brews a Business

What if it was 1925 and you wanted to open a Tea Room? What if you were a…woman that wanted to open a business? In this dramatic presentation, Maizie Stanton will explain how her husband reacted and what she needed to do to prepare for this undertaking. During this PSP session, the challenges faced by women who were stepping out of their homes and into the business world will be explored. Participants will engage in a lively discussion about the Tea Room craze and the evolution of women as entrepreneurs.

Maureen O’Connor Leach
First Person Interpreter

Grantee Events

April 4, 2018 at 6:45 PM | Bloomfield, NJ | Bloomfield Public Library

Take Pride, Bloomfield

This is how a family keeps a secret...and how that secret ends up keeping them. This is how a family lives happily ever after…until happily ever after becomes complicated. This is how children change…and then change the world. This Is How It Always Is is a novel about revelations, transformations, fairy tales, and family. And families with secrets don’t get to keep them forever.

A discussion of Laurie Frankel's book, featuring the author via Skype.

Public Scholars Project

April 5, 2018 at 2:00 PM | Brigantine, NJ | Atlantic County Library, Brigantine Branch

Revolutionary Tea: An 18th Century Tea Experience

Why was tea so important in the lives of 18th-century people that fashion-conscious families posed for portraits with their tea sets? Did Great Britain lose her American Colonies over “the cup that cheers?” Through a discussion and demonstration lead by a costumed scholar, participants can find out more about tea lore, history, songs, and poetry in this unique session.

Stacy Roth
Historical Interpreter and Educator

Public Scholars Project

April 5, 2018 at 6:30 PM | Jersey City, NJ | Soaring Heights Charter School

Maizie Brews a Business

What if it was 1925 and you wanted to open a Tea Room? What if you were a…woman that wanted to open a business? In this dramatic presentation, Maizie Stanton will explain how her husband reacted and what she needed to do to prepare for this undertaking. During this PSP session, the challenges faced by women who were stepping out of their homes and into the business world will be explored. Participants will engage in a lively discussion about the Tea Room craze and the evolution of women as entrepreneurs.

Maureen O’Connor Leach
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 8, 2018 at 2:00 PM | Ewing, NJ | Ewing Township Historic Preservation Society

The Roebling Legacy

Spanning 200 years, the story of the Roebling dynasty is a true account of innovation and struggle during a time of industrial revolution and technological advancement in America’s history. Through landmark achievements like the Brooklyn Bridge – the “universal symbol of New York” – and the great cables on the George Washington and Golden Gate Bridges, the Roeblings and thousands of their employees helped shape modern life, built one of America’s best company towns – “a model in every respect.” In this session, participants will discover how this high profile New Jersey family influenced life then and life today.

Clifford Zink
Author

Public Scholars Project

April 9, 2018 at 6:30 PM | Union, NJ | Union Free Public Library

The Life and Writing of James Baldwin

The influence of writer and social critic James Baldwin reached far and wide. In this unique exploration of Baldwin’s groundbreaking literary and social justice work, actor/comic Grant Cooper and scholar Dr. Lindsey Swindall engage participants in an interactive dialogue that unravels the truths of racism in this country and examines other themes in Baldwin’s writings. Mr. Cooper’s dramatic interpretations of Baldwin’s writing are complemented by historical context from Dr. Swindall, leading to thought provoking questions that spark audience participation.

Lindsey Swindall, Ph.D. & Grant Cooper
Educator at Stevens Institute of Technology & Comedian

Public Scholars Project

April 9, 2018 at 8:00 PM | Cranford, NJ | St. Michael's Rosary Society

Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Satire

For decades, countless American women fought for the right to vote. But many others—like the costumed fictional Anti-Suffragist portrayed in this program—fought against it. Written by pro-Suffragist Marie Jenney Howe in 1912, this witty, insightful satire sheds light on some of the apparently absurd arguments offered by those opposed to the Suffragist movement. Anti arguments like “If given the ballot, would she destroy civilization by voting with—or by voting against !—her own husband ?” will be explored, while insight about the sociological, historical, and political context informs the arguments against Suffrage.

Michèle LaRue
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 10, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Bayville, NJ | Ocean County Library, Berkeley Branch

The Fiddle in America: A History and Demonstration

How often do you get to hear music and then have a high-energy conversation about its role in historical traditions, its cultural influence, and its style and technique? Until the early twentieth century, the fiddle was the centerpiece of American folk music and folk culture. In this interactive session, Backes explores the origins and history of American fiddle music—covering a range of styles and modes of expression—and raises along the way big questions about musical tradition and music making.

Matthew Backes, Ph.D.
American Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

April 12, 2018 at 11:00 AM | Lawrenceville, NJ | Mercer County Library, Lawrence Headquarters Branch

Revolutionary Tea: An 18th Century Tea Experience

Why was tea so important in the lives of 18th-century people that fashion-conscious families posed for portraits with their tea sets? Did Great Britain lose her American Colonies over “the cup that cheers?” Through a discussion and demonstration lead by a costumed scholar, participants can find out more about tea lore, history, songs, and poetry in this unique session.

Stacy Roth
Historical Interpreter and Educator

Grant Deadlines

April 12, 2018 | Trenton, NJ | New Jersey Council for the Humanities

2018 Action Grant application deadline (required)

Final applications must be submitted through our online system by the 11:59 p.m. on April 12, 2018. Materials submitted late will not be considered.

To learn more visit: http://njhumanities.org/grants/action-grants/

Public Scholars Project

April 14, 2018 at 1:45 PM | Cherry Hill, NJ | Cherry Hill Public Library

The Legend of the Jersey Devil

In 1735, Mother Leeds was about to deliver her thirteenth child. Feeling tired and weary of the burden, she cursed the unborn child. According to the folklore, she gave birth to the devil’s child at their home in the Pine Barrens. Today, the tale of Jersey Devil is often discussed as just that – a tale. However, during the time of the fabled Jersey Devil’s reign of terror, South Jersey residents were truly frightened. How the accounts were reported on and the folklore that developed will be discussed during this session.

Angus Kress Gillespie, Ph.D.
Professor of American Studies and Urban Studies

Public Scholars Project

April 14, 2018 at 11:00 AM | Holmdel, NJ | New Jersey Vietnam Veterans' Memorial Foundation

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 14, 2018 at 2:00 PM | Willingboro, NJ | Willingboro Public Library

The Life and Writing of James Baldwin

The influence of writer and social critic James Baldwin reached far and wide. In this unique exploration of Baldwin’s groundbreaking literary and social justice work, actor/comic Grant Cooper and scholar Dr. Lindsey Swindall engage participants in an interactive dialogue that unravels the truths of racism in this country and examines other themes in Baldwin’s writings. Mr. Cooper’s dramatic interpretations of Baldwin’s writing are complemented by historical context from Dr. Swindall, leading to thought provoking questions that spark audience participation.

Lindsey Swindall, Ph.D. & Grant Cooper
Educator at Stevens Institute of Technology & Comedian

Public Scholars Project

April 15, 2018 at 2:00 PM | Stockton, NJ | Delaware River Mill Society

Revolutionary Tea: An 18th Century Tea Experience

Why was tea so important in the lives of 18th-century people that fashion-conscious families posed for portraits with their tea sets? Did Great Britain lose her American Colonies over “the cup that cheers?” Through a discussion and demonstration lead by a costumed scholar, participants can find out more about tea lore, history, songs, and poetry in this unique session.

Stacy Roth
Historical Interpreter and Educator

Public Scholars Project

April 18, 2018 at 7:30 PM | Vineland, NJ | Buena Vista Township Hall

The Wit and Wisdom of Abraham Lincoln

Discover the personal side of Abraham Lincoln. The program covers the great man’s formative years, his courtship and marriage, the beginnings and development of his abolitionist view point, and his first – though not very successful – trip to Congress. Discussion points also include the causes of the Civil War, major events and turning points within the war, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address.

Bob Gleason
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 18, 2018 at 11:00 AM | Maplewood, NJ | Maplewood Memorial Library

From Revolution to Solutions: Informed Cinema & Conversation about Newark

Newark, the largest city in New Jersey, has a complex and rich history. Clips from three acclaimed, award-winning documentaries by filmmakers Marylou & Jerome Bongiorno – Revolution ’67 (explores the 1967 Newark Riots/Rebellion), The Rule (examines urban school reform using the model of St. Benedict’s Prep), and Rust (investigates solutions to intergenerational poverty including prisoner reentry) – will allow a look at the past, present, and future of Newark. Participants will be able to learn about and discuss the opportunities and challenges of urban environments by examining Newark as a microcosm.

Marylou & Jerome Bongiorno
Filmmakers

Grantee Events

April 18, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Bloomfield, NJ | Bloomfield Public Library

Take Pride, Bloomfield

When police raided the Stonewall Inn, a popular gay bar in the Greenwich Village on June 28, 1969, the street erupted into violent protests that lasted six days. The Stonewall riots marked a major turning point in the modern gay civil rights movement in the United States and around the world.

The screening of this documentary film will be followed by a facilitated discussion.

Public Scholars Project

April 19, 2018 at 7:00 PM | West Deptford, NJ | West Deptford Free Public Library

‘Ere the Shadows Fade: New Jersey’s Civil War Era Photographers

Why were photographers important during the Civil War Era? The then-new ability to capture images at that time resulted in an increase in demand – from soldiers and families – for images of loved ones. More galleries opened and photographers moved to areas in need during and post war. Several notable New Jersey photographers, including George S. Cook and Theodore Gubelman contributed to the field. In this session, the evolution of the photography industry and the significance of the images captured will guide the conversation.

Gary D. Saretzky
Archivist, educator, and photographer

Public Scholars Project

April 20, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Oakland, NJ | Oakland Public Library

Theodore Roosevelt: “American in the Arena”

Bringing his vigorous persona (and his boisterous family) to the White House, “TR” helped catapult the U.S. into a new century. War hero to Nobel Peace Prize winner, naturalist to imperialist, The 26th President promoted progressive reform and stronger government control of business. Believing that the security of the American People would be achieved through leadership on the World Stage, President Roosevelt expanded U.S. influence around the globe.

Peyton Dixon
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 21, 2018 at 2:00 PM | Vineland, NJ | Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society

How New Jersey Photographers Captured Life Through Portraiture

In the 19th century, the world was introduced to the daguerreotype, ambrotype, the tintype, and other photography advancements. Photography exploded and transformed Americans’daily lives. Portraits became commonplace and many New Jersey photographers added to the collective production of images that tell the story of men and women in the 1800s. In this PSP session, images will showcase the photography of the time and enhance the discussion of the impact of photography.

Gary D. Saretzky
Archivist, educator, and photographer

Public Scholars Project

April 21, 2018 at 2:00 PM | South Plainfield, NJ | South Plainfield Free Public Library

Franklin Delano Roosevelt: "An Arsenal for Democracy"

The date is December 29, 1940. Franklin Delano Roosevelt has just been re-elected to an unprecedented third term in office. But the world is in a crisis. Nazi Germany has blazed the path of destruction across Europe, and America may soon be drawn into war. Meet with the President just prior to his delivery of the famous “Arsenal for Democracy” speech.

Neill Hartley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 21, 2018 at 11:00 AM | Marlton, NJ | Wiley Christian Retirement Community

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Grantee Events

April 21, 2018 at 11:00 AM | Morristown, NJ | Presbyterian Church in Morristown

Blessed Be the Tie that Binds

Bethel AME Church, with collaborating partners Drew University, the Morris School District and the Morristown & Morris Township Library, request funds for a series of public programs around historic and contemporary race relations in Morris County and the state of NJ. We anticipate each program will draw a different audience segment. The programs consist of a scholar panel; a Juneteeth celebration geared towards families; and a Facilitated Dialogue Training session aimed at community and youth leaders.

Grantee Events

April 21, 2018 at 11:00 AM | Montclair, NJ | Montclair Fire Department Community Room

150 Years of Montclair Voices

In honor of the 150th anniversary of Montclair, we will be conducting oral histories from people who grew up in Montclair and/or lived here prior to 1960. The goal is to record the stories of people who grew up in a wide variety of neighborhoods and decades, creating a multifaceted snapshot of Montclair in the early to mid 20th century. If you or someone you know wishes to tell your story, please register for this Storytelling Day at 973-744-1796 or mail@montclairhistorical.org.

Public Scholars Project

April 22, 2018 at 3:00 PM | Middlesex, NJ | Middlesex Public Library

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 22, 2018 at 2:00 PM | Toms River, NJ | Ocean County Historical Society

Maizie Brews a Business

What if it was 1925 and you wanted to open a Tea Room? What if you were a…woman that wanted to open a business? In this dramatic presentation, Maizie Stanton will explain how her husband reacted and what she needed to do to prepare for this undertaking. During this PSP session, the challenges faced by women who were stepping out of their homes and into the business world will be explored. Participants will engage in a lively discussion about the Tea Room craze and the evolution of women as entrepreneurs.

Maureen O’Connor Leach
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 24, 2018 at 12:45 PM | Flemington, NJ | Flemington Presbyterian Church

Ichabod Crane, Washington Irving, and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

The presenter brings an all new adaptation of this horror story written by Washington Irving. The interactive one-man interpretation of the story of the headless horseman draws the audience into the schoolmaster’s world in sleepy Tarry Town. The program, followed by discussion about this 19th century author who also wrote Rip Van Winkle, ends with a dramatic reading of the story’s postscript.

Neill Hartley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

April 25, 2018 at 6:30 PM | Elizabeth, NJ | Elizabeth Public Library

The Ark, the Grail, and the Quest for Discovery

Each Indiana Jones adventure transports us to places of high adventure and intrigue, where the secrets of earlier times are discovered one clue at a time. Archaeologists dig up the past and we are often fascinated with what is uncovered. Why? Through a look at the history and legend of the Ark of the Covenant and the Holy Grail, participants can learn about how archaeology helps us to learn about the past as well as why we are so captivated by digging it up.

Christopher M. Bellitto, Ph.D.
Professor of History at Kean University

Public Scholars Project

April 25, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Riverdale, NJ | Riverdale Public Library

Springsteen and his Layered Lyrics

Bruce Springsteen expects attentiveness of his listeners. How do we know this? Over the past 50 years, Springsteen has written songs and created music that have been experienced by countless fans. But many don’t know the extent to which his work has been influenced by the American folk tradition. Through experimental reinterpretation and the creation of new traditions, The Boss has worked within known folk traditions, but at the same time, created new sounds and messages. In this session, participants can learn about some of the works that have influenced one of Jersey’s most celebrated musical artists.

Prudence Jones, Ph.D.
Professor at Montclair University

Public Scholars Project

April 27, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Perth Amboy, NJ | Raritan Bay YMCA

What is Jazz and Why Does It Matter?

Branford Marsalis once said, "What is jazz? It, It's almost like asking, What is French? Jazz is a musical language. It's a musical dialect that actually embodies the spirit of America.” Sometimes called “America’s Classical Music,” the tradition and history of the genre embodies the essence of freedom and democracy. From its origins within the slaves songs, to the advent of the blues, Dixieland, Swing, Bebop, and other styles, jazz exhibits how each individual (through his/her independence) must function within the framework of a group to better serve the entire community. In this session, through music and discussion, participants will explore jazz and why it matters.

Michael Conklin
Jazz Historian

Public Scholars Project

April 28, 2018 at 11:00 AM | Milford, NJ | Holland Township Free Public Library

Allergies: A Brief History

Have you ever considered how long the invisible world of allergies has been interrupting life in our country? The rise of allergies in America goes back to their historical beginnings in the early 1800s. In this session, participants will look at uncertainties associated with allergies as well as the increase in allergies that happens to track with the rise of industrialization. The stories we tell about allergies, along with our related thoughts and fears about nature, technology, and the environment will be explored. Participants will be invited to learn about how science and technology help us to combat allergies too. And that’s nothing to sneeze at.

Theresa MacPhail, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor at Stevens Institute of Technology

Public Scholars Project

April 29, 2018 at 2:00 PM | Englishtown, NJ | Village Inn in Englishtown

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Grantee Events

April 29, 2018 at 3:00 PM | Bloomfield, NJ | Park United Methodist Church

Take Pride, Bloomfield

We invite you to sit down and enjoy a meal with LGBT people and allies of all ages for a transformative conversation about aging in the LGBT community. Offered in partnership with the Bloomfield Municipal Alliance, Clara Maas, and Bloomfield Pride.

Facilitators: Lisa Hoffman, MLS, Bloomfield Library; Maya Lordo, MS, MCHES, REHS Township of Bloomfield Department of Health & Human Services; and members of Bloomfield Pride.