Events for March 2018

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Grantee Events

January 25, 2018 - March 9, 2018 | Edison, NJ | Middlesex County College, Studio Theatre Gallery

A Town Known as Auschwitz: The Life and Death of a Jewish Community

Discover the rich history of Oświęcim, Poland – the town the Germans called Auschwitz – through photographs that trace the life of the town and its Jewish residents, from the 16th century through the post-war period.

Grant Deadlines

February 19, 2018 - March 16, 2018 | Trenton, NJ | New Jersey Council for the Humanities

2018 Action Grant Intent to Apply period (required)

Potential applications are required to submit an Intent to Apply though our online application system by March 16, 2018.

To learn more visit: http://njhumanities.org/grants/action-grants/

Public Scholars Project

March 1, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Scotch Plains, NJ | Scotch Plains Public Library

The Shannachie of Glendunbun Ballybeg: Traditional Celtic Tales

The wit and wisdom, humor and horror, and hubris and humanity of a people are found in their traditional stories. Compelling storyteller David Emerson retells (and embroiders) the colorful and ancient tales of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and Cornwall in a presentation that will “warm, tickle, or chill the heart.”

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

March 1, 2018 at 10:30 AM | Manahawkin, NJ | Ocean County Library, Stafford Branch

Annie Oakley: "Aim for a High Mark"

Annie Oakley, a diminutive sharpshooter and exhibition shooter, competed in a sport and in a world dominated by men. She felt strongly that women were just as capable as men and insisted that they should strive to achieve any goal or occupation that interested them. Her motto was to “Aim for a high mark…for practice will make you perfect.” and her hope was that all women would reach the “Bulls-eye of Success.”

Kim Hanley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 2, 2018 at 11:00 AM | Howell, NJ | Howell Township Department of Senior Services

The Fiddle in America: A History and Demonstration

How often do you get to hear music and then have a high-energy conversation about its role in historical traditions, its cultural influence, and its style and technique? Until the early twentieth century, the fiddle was the centerpiece of American folk music and folk culture. In this interactive session, Backes explores the origins and history of American fiddle music—covering a range of styles and modes of expression—and raises along the way big questions about musical tradition and music making.

Matthew Backes, Ph.D.
American Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

March 3, 2018 at 2:00 PM | Willingboro, NJ | Willingboro Public Library

Rosa Parks: First Lady of Civil Rights

On a December day in 1955, this tired seamstress and NAACP secretary refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery Alabama Bus. Rosa Parks' story will serve to remind all who hear it that we cannot always stand by and observe the status quo. We all bear the responsibility to bring about the changes that will help "We the People..." form that "...more Perfect Union" that is our Nation's promise.

Alex Ford
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 4, 2018 at 2:00 PM | Eatontown, NJ | Eatontown Community Center

Over Here, Molly Pitcher

This interpretive storytelling program relates the legend of “Molly Pitcher” (Mary Hays McCauley), the heroine of the 1778 Battle of Monmouth Courthouse – and explores the daily lives of the “women of the army” who followed their husbands to war during the American Revolution. Molly reminisces about when she accompanied her husband through summer battles and winter encampments from Valley Forge to Monmouth to Morristown. Relating her tales of firing a cannon in the heat of battle to trudging “behind the baggage,” she provides a glimpse into what it was like to be a “camp follower” in the days when American independence was a dream rather a certainty.

Stacy Roth
Historical Interpreter and Educator

Public Scholars Project

March 6, 2018 at 1:00 PM | Warren, NJ | Somerset County Library, Warren Branch

Over Here, Molly Pitcher

This interpretive storytelling program relates the legend of “Molly Pitcher” (Mary Hays McCauley), the heroine of the 1778 Battle of Monmouth Courthouse – and explores the daily lives of the “women of the army” who followed their husbands to war during the American Revolution. Molly reminisces about when she accompanied her husband through summer battles and winter encampments from Valley Forge to Monmouth to Morristown. Relating her tales of firing a cannon in the heat of battle to trudging “behind the baggage,” she provides a glimpse into what it was like to be a “camp follower” in the days when American independence was a dream rather a certainty.

Stacy Roth
Historical Interpreter and Educator

Grantee Events

March 8, 2018 at 2:00 PM | Edison, NJ | The Holocaust and Human Rights Center at Middlesex County College

Bringing Genocide and Human Rights Awareness to the Middlesex County Community

Holocaust survivor Sol Lurie was rescued from Auschwitz when he was 15 years old, having survived six concentration camps. Born and raised in a small town in Lithuania, Sol will recount being forced into ghettos with his family and then five different concentration camps before arriving at Auschwitz, where he
witnessed the destructive power of hate. Never giving up hope after more than three years as a prisoner, Sol was brought to the United States after the war as an orphan and has dedicated his life to educating the world about the horrors of the Holocaust.

Public Scholars Project

March 9, 2018 at 1:00 PM | East Windsor, NJ | East Windsor Senior Center

Rosa Parks: First Lady of Civil Rights

On a December day in 1955, this tired seamstress and NAACP secretary refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery Alabama Bus. Rosa Parks' story will serve to remind all who hear it that we cannot always stand by and observe the status quo. We all bear the responsibility to bring about the changes that will help "We the People..." form that "...more Perfect Union" that is our Nation's promise.

Alex Ford
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM | Plainsboro, NJ | Plainsboro Public Library

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 10, 2018 at 10:00 AM | Woodstown, NJ | Friends Village

Over Here, Molly Pitcher

This interpretive storytelling program relates the legend of “Molly Pitcher” (Mary Hays McCauley), the heroine of the 1778 Battle of Monmouth Courthouse – and explores the daily lives of the “women of the army” who followed their husbands to war during the American Revolution. Molly reminisces about when she accompanied her husband through summer battles and winter encampments from Valley Forge to Monmouth to Morristown. Relating her tales of firing a cannon in the heat of battle to trudging “behind the baggage,” she provides a glimpse into what it was like to be a “camp follower” in the days when American independence was a dream rather a certainty.

Stacy Roth
Historical Interpreter and Educator

Public Scholars Project

March 12, 2018 at 6:30 PM | Union, NJ | Union Free Public Library

Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Satire

For decades, countless American women fought for the right to vote. But many others—like the costumed fictional Anti-Suffragist portrayed in this program—fought against it. Written by pro-Suffragist Marie Jenney Howe in 1912, this witty, insightful satire sheds light on some of the apparently absurd arguments offered by those opposed to the Suffragist movement. Anti arguments like “If given the ballot, would she destroy civilization by voting with—or by voting against !—her own husband ?” will be explored, while insight about the sociological, historical, and political context informs the arguments against Suffrage.

Michèle LaRue
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 13, 2018 at 11:00 AM | Princeton, NJ | Princeton Public Library

Writing About Other People's Memories

Consider how the children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren of Holocaust survivors have a living connection to the memories that were passed on to them. Survivors’ memories become their memories, and to some degree, they bind them to the past. In fact, many of us are caught between our elders’ history and the lives we are living. The legacy that binds us to the past also inspires us to pass these memories on. Building a foundation of understanding through the narratives of others, like those of descendants of survivors, this session will explore why and how we share generational stories.

Ellen G. Friedman, Ph.D.
Professor of English at The College of New Jersey

Public Scholars Project

March 13, 2018 at 3:30 PM | East Windsor, NJ | Springpoint at Meadows Lakes

Women, Feminism, and Islam

How often do you hear the words “Islam” and “feminism” together? Perhaps a better question is – how often should you hear those two words together? Stereotypes and perspectives about Islam sometimes include the notion of the “Poor Muslim Woman” and do not acknowledge any developments in feminism or political activism. In this session, the common notion of the oppression of Islamic women and the movement of Islamic feminism as well as a general discussion of gender and women’s rights will help participants further their understanding of Islam and feminism.

Sylvia Chan-Malik, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor in the Departments of American and Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

March 14, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Westampton, NJ | National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of New Jersey

Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Satire

For decades, countless American women fought for the right to vote. But many others—like the costumed fictional Anti-Suffragist portrayed in this program—fought against it. Written by pro-Suffragist Marie Jenney Howe in 1912, this witty, insightful satire sheds light on some of the apparently absurd arguments offered by those opposed to the Suffragist movement. Anti arguments like “If given the ballot, would she destroy civilization by voting with—or by voting against !—her own husband ?” will be explored, while insight about the sociological, historical, and political context informs the arguments against Suffrage.

Michèle LaRue
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 14, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Moorestown, NJ | Moorestown Public Library

Cancer Alley or the Garden State?

It’s time to talk about the environment in New Jersey, but it’s definitely not a new discussion. Land use from 400 years ago still impacts our health and land today. Progressive thinkers in the 1970s prompted a closer look at protection, preservation, and stewardship, which resulted in protective legislative policies. Through the lens of human interest stories and environmental events, participants will discuss the environmental history of the state and how citizens can be informed and empowered to act.

Thomas Belton
Research Associate in Science Writing with the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University

Public Scholars Project

March 15, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Sewell, NJ | Margaret E Heggan Free Public Library

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 16, 2018 at 1:00 PM | Rivervale, NJ | River Vale Free Public Library

Allergies: A Brief History

Have you ever considered how long the invisible world of allergies has been interrupting life in our country? The rise of allergies in America goes back to their historical beginnings in the early 1800s. In this session, participants will look at uncertainties associated with allergies as well as the increase in allergies that happens to track with the rise of industrialization. The stories we tell about allergies, along with our related thoughts and fears about nature, technology, and the environment will be explored. Participants will be invited to learn about how science and technology help us to combat allergies too. And that’s nothing to sneeze at.

Theresa MacPhail, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor at Stevens Institute of Technology

Public Scholars Project

March 16, 2018 at 2:00 PM | Westfield, NJ | Westfield Senior Citizen Housing Two

The Shannachie of Glendunbun Ballybeg: Traditional Celtic Tales

The wit and wisdom, humor and horror, and hubris and humanity of a people are found in their traditional stories. Compelling storyteller David Emerson retells (and embroiders) the colorful and ancient tales of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and Cornwall in a presentation that will “warm, tickle, or chill the heart.”

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Grantee Events

March 16, 2018 at 6:30 PM | Bloomfield, NJ | Bloomfield Public Library

Take Pride, Bloomfield

Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli - Sixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight. Now change-averse Simon has to find a way to step out of his comfort zone before he's pushed out.

Public Scholars Project

March 18, 2018 at 2:00 PM | Bridgewater, NJ | Heritage Trail Association (Van Horne House)

Revolutionary Tea: An 18th Century Tea Experience

Why was tea so important in the lives of 18th-century people that fashion-conscious families posed for portraits with their tea sets? Did Great Britain lose her American Colonies over “the cup that cheers?” Through a discussion and demonstration lead by a costumed scholar, participants can find out more about tea lore, history, songs, and poetry in this unique session.

Stacy Roth
Historical Interpreter and Educator

Public Scholars Project

March 20, 2018 at 2:00 PM | Allentown, NJ | Allentown First Aid Squad Building

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 22, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Jersey City, NJ | Apple Tree House

Learning New Jersey…One Building at a Time

Sometimes when we “see” something all the time, we don’t really see it. What have you noticed about the built environment around you lately? In the Garden State, ranging across 21 counties and five centuries, from pre-European settlement to post-industrial reinvention, from log cabins and lighthouses, to highways, diners, and tract houses, we are literally surrounded by a unique and historically significant landscapes. In this session, while examining images of NJ buildings, participants will consider different aspects – aesthetics, cultural and economic perspectives, and values and meaning – to develop skills for reading everyday landscapes in order to better understand community and place and why they matter.

Gabrielle Esperdy, Ph.D.
Professor & Historian

Public Scholars Project

March 22, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Waldwick, NJ | Waldwick Public Library

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 24, 2018 at 1:00 PM | Tuckerton, NJ | Tuckerton Seaport and Baymen's Museum

The Legend of the Jersey Devil

In 1735, Mother Leeds was about to deliver her thirteenth child. Feeling tired and weary of the burden, she cursed the unborn child. According to the folklore, she gave birth to the devil’s child at their home in the Pine Barrens. Today, the tale of Jersey Devil is often discussed as just that – a tale. However, during the time of the fabled Jersey Devil’s reign of terror, South Jersey residents were truly frightened. How the accounts were reported on and the folklore that developed will be discussed during this session.

Angus Kress Gillespie, Ph.D.
Professor of American Studies and Urban Studies

Public Scholars Project

March 25, 2018 at 3:00 PM | Pennington, NJ | Pennington Public Library

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: Preservation and Grace, and American Legacy

She was a Kennedy. She was an Onassis. She did not define herself by her husbands. Realizing that future generations would need the insights of the past for guidance, her preservation efforts galvanized the rest of the country to protect its historic monuments. Aided by her public profile, her work helped bring about the Historic Preservation Act of 1966: the most far-reaching preservation legislation ever enacted in the United States.

Jill Lawrence
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 27, 2018 at 12:30 PM | Piscataway, NJ | Piscataway Township Senior Center

Jersey’s Most Famous Road, the Turnpike

Think back to your last Turnpike experience. For some, it’s an occasional ride, for others it’s part of the daily grind. Have you considered what it took to create that road? New Jersey was a pioneer in major highway innovation (the Turnpike even predates the interstate highway system). In this interactive discussion, participants will be encouraged to consider its execution, significance in travel, aesthetics, and impact and how it can be seen as an emblem of American ideas and values.

Angus Kress Gillespie, Ph.D.
Professor of American Studies and Urban Studies

Public Scholars Project

March 27, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Bernardsville, NJ | Bernardsville Public Library

Franklin Delano Roosevelt: "An Arsenal for Democracy"

The date is December 29, 1940. Franklin Delano Roosevelt has just been re-elected to an unprecedented third term in office. But the world is in a crisis. Nazi Germany has blazed the path of destruction across Europe, and America may soon be drawn into war. Meet with the President just prior to his delivery of the famous “Arsenal for Democracy” speech.

Neill Hartley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

March 28, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Spring Lake, NJ | Spring Lake Public Library

The Shannachie of Glendunbun Ballybeg: Traditional Celtic Tales

The wit and wisdom, humor and horror, and hubris and humanity of a people are found in their traditional stories. Compelling storyteller David Emerson retells (and embroiders) the colorful and ancient tales of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and Cornwall in a presentation that will “warm, tickle, or chill the heart.”

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

March 28, 2018 at 12:30 PM | Monmouth Junction, NJ | South Brunswick Public Library

Go, van Gogh!

At one point, Vincent van Gogh wrote to his brother that since he had no children, he viewed his paintings as his progeny. A painter and pastor, van Gogh produced more than 2,000 “brilliant children.” In this session, dozens of his works of art, with a focus on pieces at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, will be explored. An overview of his life experiences and how it influenced his art will lead to a lively discussion, which will include talking about the differences between experiencing original artwork and reproductions.

Michael Norris, Ph.D.
Art Historian

Grantee Events

March 28, 2018 at 7:00 PM | Bloomfield, NJ | Bloomfield Public Library

Take Pride, Bloomfield

Is there such a thing as a "gay voice"? Why do some people "sound gay" but not others? Why are gay voices a mainstay of pop culture but also a trigger for harassment? Do I Sound Gay? explores these questions and includes revealing interviews with Margaret Cho, Tim Gunn, Dan Savage, David Sedaris and George Takei.

Grant Deadlines

March 30, 2018 | Trenton, NJ | New Jersey Council for the Humanities

2018 Action Grant draft submission deadline (optional)

Invited applicants may submit one draft for review by March 30, 2018.

To learn more visit: http://njhumanities.org/grants/action-grants/