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Grantee Events

January 27, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Teaneck, NJ | Teaneck Public Library

I Shall Not be Silent: Film Screening and Discussion

The Enslaved African Memorial Committee & the Northern New Jersey Holocaust Memorial & Education Committees are proud to present Joachim Prinz: I Shall Not Be Silent (2014), the story of civil rights activist, Rabbi Joachim Prinz. The film will be followed by a Q&A with producers Rachel Fisher and Rachel Pasternak, the principals of R2, a multimedia production company. They also produced the documentary film “Remembering Oswiecim”, which is shown daily at the Auschwitz Jewish Center in Oswiecim, Poland.

Public Scholars Project

January 27, 2019 at 3:00 PM | Fanwood, NJ | Fanwood Memorial Library

Theodore Roosevelt: “American in the Arena”

Bringing his vigorous persona (and his boisterous family) to the White House, “TR” helped catapult the U.S. into a new century. War hero to Nobel Peace Prize winner, naturalist to imperialist, The 26th President promoted progressive reform and stronger government control of business. Believing that the security of the American People would be achieved through leadership on the World Stage, President Roosevelt expanded U.S. influence around the globe.

Peyton Dixon
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

January 31, 2019 at 6:30 PM | Oakland, NJ | Oakland Public Library

What’s the Verdict?

Each year, the Supreme Court receives 9,000-10,000 case petitions for certiorari (consideration) and less than 1% are reviewed. The cases chosen are signficiant. In this session, participants are encouraged to consider some of the pending cases before the Court. Through an examination of texts and documents participants can, with the guidance of prompting questions, consider and discuss the contemporary political and moral concerns raised by what’s on the Supreme Court docket.

Ian Drake, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Political Science and Jurisprudence at Montclair State University

Grant Deadlines

February 1, 2019 - February 22, 2019 | Trenton, NJ | New Jersey Council for the Humanities

2019 Action Grant Intent to Apply period (required)

Potential applications are required to submit an Intent to Apply though our online application system by February 22, 2019.

To learn more visit: http://njhumanities.org/grants/action-grants/

Public Scholars Project

February 2, 2019 at 2:00 PM | New Brunswick, NJ | New Brunswick Free Public Library

Paul Robeson, A Chautauqua

Mr. Jefferson brings the life of Paul Robeson alive through first-person historical characterization. Robeson, one of the most well known African-Americans of the 20th century, was a renaissance man, a social activist, scholar, intellectual, lawyer, All-American athlete, singer, linguist, humanist, and advocate for international peace.

Marvin Jefferson
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 3, 2019 at 3:00 PM | Pennington, NJ | Hopewell Museum

‘Ere the Shadows Fade: New Jersey’s Civil War Era Photographers

Why were photographers important during the Civil War Era? The then-new ability to capture images at that time resulted in an increase in demand – from soldiers and families – for images of loved ones. More galleries opened and photographers moved to areas in need during and post war. Several notable New Jersey photographers, including George S. Cook and Theodore Gubelman contributed to the field. In this session, the evolution of the photography industry and the significance of the images captured will guide the conversation.

Gary D. Saretzky
Archivist, educator, and photographer

Public Scholars Project

February 5, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Crosswicks, NJ | Burlington County Library System, Crosswicks Branch

New Jersey, Pre & Post Revolution

Have you ever thought about how New Jersey was created? Perhaps you’ve wondered about how East and West Jersey came to be? Or you’ve considered how life changed for landowners as the American Revolution intensified? The way the state developed before, during, and after the revolution, including some of its distinctive features that still remain today, is fascinating. In this session, significant topics like New Jersey’s role in politics, transportation, trade, and agricultural on the eve of revolution will be explored.

Jonathan Mercantini, Ph.D.
Acting Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Associate Professor of History at Kean University

Public Scholars Project

February 7, 2019 at 7:00 PM | East Brunswick, NJ | East Brunswick Public Library

What is Jazz and Why Does It Matter?

Branford Marsalis once said, "What is jazz? It, It's almost like asking, What is French? Jazz is a musical language. It's a musical dialect that actually embodies the spirit of America.” Sometimes called “America’s Classical Music,” the tradition and history of the genre embodies the essence of freedom and democracy. From its origins within the slaves songs, to the advent of the blues, Dixieland, Swing, Bebop, and other styles, jazz exhibits how each individual (through his/her independence) must function within the framework of a group to better serve the entire community. In this session, through music and discussion, participants will explore jazz and why it matters.

Michael Conklin
Jazz Historian

Public Scholars Project

February 7, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Jersey City, NJ | Apple Tree House

New Jersey, Pre & Post Revolution

Have you ever thought about how New Jersey was created? Perhaps you’ve wondered about how East and West Jersey came to be? Or you’ve considered how life changed for landowners as the American Revolution intensified? The way the state developed before, during, and after the revolution, including some of its distinctive features that still remain today, is fascinating. In this session, significant topics like New Jersey’s role in politics, transportation, trade, and agricultural on the eve of revolution will be explored.

Jonathan Mercantini, Ph.D.
Acting Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Associate Professor of History at Kean University

Public Scholars Project

February 10, 2019 at 1:00 PM | Piscataway, NJ | Heritage Trail Association (Van Horne House)

Paul Robeson, A Chautauqua

Mr. Jefferson brings the life of Paul Robeson alive through first-person historical characterization. Robeson, one of the most well known African-Americans of the 20th century, was a renaissance man, a social activist, scholar, intellectual, lawyer, All-American athlete, singer, linguist, humanist, and advocate for international peace.

Marvin Jefferson
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 11, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Clark, NJ | Clark Public Library

George Washington Remembers New Jersey

Washington was no stranger to New Jersey. From Trenton to Princeton to Morristown to Monmouth to Middlebrook, (and more), the General spent more time here than in any other state. Join General Washington as he reminisces about his brightest and darkest moments during the battles and encampments of the “Cockpit of the Revolution.” In this session, participants will learn more about New Jersey's role in the American Revolution from the perspective of George Washington.

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

February 12, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Fort Lee, NJ | Fort Lee Public Library

The Best Kept Secret in American Journalism: The Associated Negro Press

A story of persistence, creativity, and determination, the Associated Negro Press and its founder Claude Barnett delivered national and international news coverage that was remarkable for its substance and scope. Barnett, a Tuskegee Institute graduate, founded the ANP in 1919. Despite limited resources and numerous difficulties, the ANP ran for over forty years. Eventually, the black press was often referred to as “the greatest single power in the Negro race.” In this session, the story of the black press and it influence, then and now, will be discussed.

Lawrence Hogan, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of History at Union County College

Public Scholars Project

February 12, 2019 at 1:00 PM | Sparta, NJ | Sparta Public Library

The Wit and Wisdom of Abraham Lincoln

Discover the personal side of Abraham Lincoln. The program covers the great man’s formative years, his courtship and marriage, the beginnings and development of his abolitionist view point, and his first – though not very successful – trip to Congress. Discussion points also include the causes of the Civil War, major events and turning points within the war, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address.

Bob Gleason
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 12, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Livingston, NJ | Livingston Public Library

How We See Ourselves in What We Read

Do children, maybe your children or your students, see themselves in the books they’re reading? What do you see in those books? What they’re reading may be representative, but then again, it may not be. It’s important to identify the harmful representations overall and ensure exposure to diversity for growth and development. Reading plays such a huge role in developing critical thinking skills and empathy. In this session, a guided discussion will explore aspects of social justice and representation through a look at a variety of carefully chosen texts.

Laura Nicosia, Ph.D.
Associate Professor at Montclair State University

Public Scholars Project

February 13, 2019 at 7:30 PM | Riverdale, NJ | Riverdale Community Center

Ichabod Crane, Washington Irving, and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

The presenter brings an all new adaptation of this horror story written by Washington Irving. The interactive one-man interpretation of the story of the headless horseman draws the audience into the schoolmaster’s world in sleepy Tarry Town. The program, followed by discussion about this 19th century author who also wrote Rip Van Winkle, ends with a dramatic reading of the story’s postscript.

Neill Hartley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 13, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Sewell, NJ | Margaret E Heggan Free Public Library

George Washington Remembers New Jersey

Washington was no stranger to New Jersey. From Trenton to Princeton to Morristown to Monmouth to Middlebrook, (and more), the General spent more time here than in any other state. Join General Washington as he reminisces about his brightest and darkest moments during the battles and encampments of the “Cockpit of the Revolution.” In this session, participants will learn more about New Jersey's role in the American Revolution from the perspective of George Washington.

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

February 13, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Cranford, NJ | Cranford Community Center

The Color Line on the Baseball Diamond

Have you considered the black part of the nation’s favorite pastime? What black baseball in America meant, including pioneers like Jackie Robinson and the rich relationships in “Blackball” during America’s era of segregation, across the nation and in New Jersey is a multifaceted narrative. During this session, a robust conversation, an account by a veteran Negro Leaguer, a rendition of an "iconic" baseball poem "K.C at the Bat" by its author, Kevin Kane, and selections from the documentary “Before You Can Say Jackie Robinson” will further participants’ understanding.

Lawrence Hogan, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of History at Union County College

Public Scholars Project

February 15, 2019 at 10:30 AM | Manahawkin, NJ | Ocean County Library, Stafford Branch

Franklin Delano Roosevelt: "An Arsenal for Democracy"

The date is December 29, 1940. Franklin Delano Roosevelt has just been re-elected to an unprecedented third term in office. But the world is in a crisis. Nazi Germany has blazed the path of destruction across Europe, and America may soon be drawn into war. Meet with the President just prior to his delivery of the famous “Arsenal for Democracy” speech.

Neill Hartley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 15, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Mountainside, NJ | Trailside Nature and Science Center

George Washington Remembers New Jersey

Washington was no stranger to New Jersey. From Trenton to Princeton to Morristown to Monmouth to Middlebrook, (and more), the General spent more time here than in any other state. Join General Washington as he reminisces about his brightest and darkest moments during the battles and encampments of the “Cockpit of the Revolution.” In this session, participants will learn more about New Jersey's role in the American Revolution from the perspective of George Washington.

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Other

February 16, 2019 at 9:00 AM | Newark, NJ | Rutgers University-Newark, The Paul Robeson Campus Center

Marion Thompson Wright Lecture Series

Join us at the 39th Annual Marion Thompson Wright Lecture Series at the Paul Robeson Campus Center. This year's topic is "The Erotic as Power: Sexuality and the Black Experience."

Public Scholars Project

February 16, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Mahwah, NJ | Mahwah Free Public Library

The Wit and Wisdom of Abraham Lincoln

Discover the personal side of Abraham Lincoln. The program covers the great man’s formative years, his courtship and marriage, the beginnings and development of his abolitionist view point, and his first – though not very successful – trip to Congress. Discussion points also include the causes of the Civil War, major events and turning points within the war, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address.

Bob Gleason
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 16, 2019 at 1:00 PM | Mount Holly, NJ | Burlington County Lyceum of History and Natural Sciences

Harriet Beecher Stowe: Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Dominion of Conscience

In 1852 Harriet Beecher Stowe published “Uncle Tom’s Cabin, or Life Among the Lowly” which helped move the conscience of the country to imperative cause of Abolitionism. Her story energized anti-slavery forces in the North, while provoking widespread anger in the pro-slavery South. Allegedly, when she met Abraham Lincoln, he said, “So you are the little woman that wrote the book that started this great war?”

Kim Hanley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 17, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | Middlesex, NJ | Middlesex Public Library

Franklin Delano Roosevelt: "An Arsenal for Democracy"

The date is December 29, 1940. Franklin Delano Roosevelt has just been re-elected to an unprecedented third term in office. But the world is in a crisis. Nazi Germany has blazed the path of destruction across Europe, and America may soon be drawn into war. Meet with the President just prior to his delivery of the famous “Arsenal for Democracy” speech.

Neill Hartley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 20, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Montville, NJ | Montville Township Public Library

Harriet Beecher Stowe: Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Dominion of Conscience

In 1852 Harriet Beecher Stowe published “Uncle Tom’s Cabin, or Life Among the Lowly” which helped move the conscience of the country to imperative cause of Abolitionism. Her story energized anti-slavery forces in the North, while provoking widespread anger in the pro-slavery South. Allegedly, when she met Abraham Lincoln, he said, “So you are the little woman that wrote the book that started this great war?”

Kim Hanley
First Person Interpreter

Public Scholars Project

February 21, 2019 at 6:30 PM | West Caldwell, NJ | West Caldwell Public Library

From Revolution to Solutions: Informed Cinema & Conversation about Newark

Newark, the largest city in New Jersey, has a complex and rich history. Clips from three acclaimed, award-winning documentaries by filmmakers Marylou & Jerome Bongiorno – Revolution ’67 (explores the 1967 Newark Riots/Rebellion), The Rule (examines urban school reform using the model of St. Benedict’s Prep), and Rust (investigates solutions to intergenerational poverty including prisoner reentry) – will allow a look at the past, present, and future of Newark. Participants will be able to learn about and discuss the opportunities and challenges of urban environments by examining Newark as a microcosm.

Marylou & Jerome Bongiorno
Filmmakers

Public Scholars Project

February 23, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | Union, NJ | Union Free Public Library

Black Comedy: No Tears, Just Politics

What pairs well with civil rights activism in the African American community? In this PSP session, it’s comedy. Drawing upon the comedic talent of Grant Cooper, who has been a stand-up comic in NYC for over twenty years, and the historical insight of African American Studies scholar Dr. Lindsey Swindall, Black Comedy brings unique insight about politics and the arts to audiences, including an examination of the historical AND contemporary significance of the intersection between civil rights activism and comedy. Participants will explore how comedy can be effective in breaking down barriers and sparking fruitful discussion.

Lindsey Swindall, Ph.D. & Grant Cooper
Educator at Stevens Institute of Technology & Comedian

Public Scholars Project

February 23, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Bayville, NJ | Ocean County Library, Berkeley Branch

Springsteen and his Layered Lyrics

Bruce Springsteen expects attentiveness of his listeners. How do we know this? Over the past 50 years, Springsteen has written songs and created music that have been experienced by countless fans. But many don’t know the extent to which his work has been influenced by the American folk tradition. Through experimental reinterpretation and the creation of new traditions, The Boss has worked within known folk traditions, but at the same time, created new sounds and messages. In this session, participants can learn about some of the works that have influenced one of Jersey’s most celebrated musical artists.

Prudence Jones, Ph.D.
Professor at Montclair University

Public Scholars Project

February 25, 2019 at 7:00 PM | Middletown, NJ | Middletown Township Public Library

George Washington Remembers New Jersey

Washington was no stranger to New Jersey. From Trenton to Princeton to Morristown to Monmouth to Middlebrook, (and more), the General spent more time here than in any other state. Join General Washington as he reminisces about his brightest and darkest moments during the battles and encampments of the “Cockpit of the Revolution.” In this session, participants will learn more about New Jersey's role in the American Revolution from the perspective of George Washington.

David Emerson
Historical Interpreter and Storyteller

Public Scholars Project

February 28, 2019 at 2:00 PM | Barnegat, NJ | Ocean County Library, Barnegat Branch

The Fiddle in America: A History and Demonstration

How often do you get to hear music and then have a high-energy conversation about its role in historical traditions, its cultural influence, and its style and technique? Until the early twentieth century, the fiddle was the centerpiece of American folk music and folk culture. In this interactive session, Backes explores the origins and history of American fiddle music—covering a range of styles and modes of expression—and raises along the way big questions about musical tradition and music making.

Matthew Backes, Ph.D.
American Studies at Rutgers University

Public Scholars Project

March 1, 2019 - January 1, 1970 | Pennington, NJ | Pennington Borough Hall

Annie Oakley: "Aim for a High Mark"

Annie Oakley, a diminutive sharpshooter and exhibition shooter, competed in a sport and in a world dominated by men. She felt strongly that women were just as capable as men and insisted that they should strive to achieve any goal or occupation that interested them. Her motto was to “Aim for a high mark…for practice will make you perfect.” and her hope was that all women would reach the “Bulls-eye of Success.”

Kim Hanley
First Person Interpreter